Apr17

Multi-Screen Is the New “Mobile First”

screensFor the past few years, “Mobile first!” has been the rally cry of marketers. The idea was to design websites and ads to work on mobile devices first to account for the growing smartphone- and tablet-using audience. But mobile first is already obsolete; if your strategy doesn’t have multiple screens in mind, then your strategy is out-of-date.

Time spent on mobile devices is steadily increasing. Throughout the day, consumers are moving seamlessly back and forth between many devices, from laptops to smartphones to tablets to TVs. In fact, 90% of consumers start a task on one device and finish it on another. Oftentimes consumers are using more than one device at a time, fluidly flipping back and forth between screens.

This complexity in user behavior makes it imperative for marketers to embrace a multi-device strategy, not just a mobile-first one.

You must now develop ads that work across these multiple devices. The ads should seamlessly leverage the characteristics of each device for optimal user experience. Additionally, where consumers used to be focused on one device at a time, now they are on multiple devices simultaneously, so messaging needs to adapt to the multi-device paradigm as well.

Consumer search trends support the need for multi-screen advertising. According to eMarketer, U.S. mobile search ad spending grew 120.8% in 2013, contributing to an overall gain of 122.0% for all mobile ads. Meanwhile, overall desktop ad spending increased just 2.3% last year. Marketers should not only develop ads for multiple platforms, they should optimize their spending across platforms as well.

Ad targeting also becomes paramount in the multi-screen world. Targeting ads to specific devices and operating systems is the most basic method of mobile ad targeting. But much like the desktop environment, user insights can be culled from the type of content consumed on tablets and smartphones. These insights can then be used to further target mobile audiences.

As consumers continue to access content across multiple devices, marketers must continue to grow and change with them to meet their needs no matter which device(s) they are using.

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Apr3

Benefits of Rich Media

The digital pharmaceutical advertising market is proving to be a growing and changing market.  Gradually over the past couple of years, more innovative tactics have become more relevant. Rich media is one tactic that has become more widely accepted not only by pharma companies and advertisers, but also by publishers. Some of you may be asking, what is rich media and why is it becoming more popular?

Rich Media Banner—This is an ad that can contain images and/or video and involves some kind of user interaction which can elicit strong user response. The ads can include multiple levels of content in one placement.

what_is_rich_media_small

 

 

The benefits of using rich media:

Ads Expand—The creative expands when the user interacts with the main image (for example, by clicking or mousing over it). This allows for a larger area to display more robust information, creative artwork and messaging while still being able to include a scrolling ISI and creative assets (videos, clinical data, polls/surveys, etc).

Breaks Through Banner Blindness—Banner blindness is a phenomenon in web usability where visitors to a website consciously or subconsciously ignore banner-like information, which can also be called ad blindness or banner noise. Rich media ads are more attention-grabbing and interactive, which helps separate them from being banner-like. Rich media banners also have proven to outperform standard display banners in key metrics such as time spent and interaction rate.

Information—Rich media banners can contain a significant amount of information, especially compared to standard display ads. This information can consist of videos, charts, clinical data, polls/surveys, or multiple creative messages. This allows advertisers to reach a larger target audience while also providing more options for multi-indication brands in one banner ad.

Metrics—The metrics in rich media banners are also greatly improved. Rich media offers standard metrics and also custom metrics. Standard metrics are more commonly known and consist of metrics like total display time, number of expansions, interactive impressions, and interactive rate. Custom metrics are added to components within a rich media banner, and only three different types are used: exits, counters and timer. These custom metrics can actually track a variety of calls to action within a rich media banner, like links within the banner, time spent on certain screens or data, and of course any click-through calls to action. These robust metrics offer a huge advantage over standard display banners which rely heavily on impressions and clicks.

User Experience—Overall user experience is improved through the use of rich media. The creative messaging can be so robust within a rich media banner that a call to action such as a click-through is not required. This actually allows users to stay on the same page where they saw the rich media banner, as opposed to clicking on a non-rich media banner that takes them to an entirely new page.

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Mar27

What the WWE Taught Me About Persona Development

I grew up watching WWF (now WWE) wrestling. Every Saturday morning I would rush through my morning breakfast with excitement to see all of my larger-than-life heroes. The sights of Hulk Hogan, “Macho Man” Randy Savage, The Ultimate Warrior, and Ricky “The Dragon” Steamboat enthralled me to a point where I was lost in appearance and personality.

Years later the characters are still there—I’m still a fan, and the audience of young kids appears to be stronger than ever. But how did the WWE keep me interested for the last 20 years? I take this thought and apply it to one of my everyday on-the-job questions: why do our targets—doctors—stop engaging with us after years of product loyalty, and what can we do about it?

With the WWE, it started with there being a 1-900 number that I called. I was overly excited as a kid to dial that number and think that Hulk Hogan was actually talking to me. The data/marketing method of the 1-900 number was very simple: associate numeric to selections on your phone to what you prefer and continue marketing to the contact in the way they want to be marketed to.

For example:  the 1-900 number asked me my age group, I choose #1 for 10-15 years old (type of message to give me); for favorite wrestler, I choose #3 for Hulk Hogan (message specific to my needs); and for the key question—if I would allow them to follow up with me via phone with updates—I choose #1 for yes (continued CRM communication).

Just like that, the 1-900 number captured all my information and knew exactly how to speak to me. To the present day, the WWE still sends me information. The below text is a screen shot of my present day phone and is proof that they remember me and my likes. This was a text sent to me just this past Sunday:

AngeloCampano_WWE
They still know I like the Hulk and they know what appeals to the 30-something me.

Clearly they created a digital persona of me and through all the years of technology used what they learned from me 20 years ago to keep my interests (especially the Hulkster).

The hypothesis that is commonly thought of is that we tend to try looking at our targets in the same way, capture what they like and what they know. We as pharma marketers spend a lot of time chasing the doctor when the doctor doesn’t respond to messages we give him or her.

Looking at a standard CRM program (delivered through multi-channel), those who spend some time targeting the office staff for the first communication have 52% more success reaching the doctor in the second and third communication than those who don’t. Much like the WWE did, we need to take the time to understand our audience, who is REALLY making us money, and how.

As marketing continues to evolve, so do the exercises marketers have been doing for decades. Persona development is not exempt from this trend. Traditional persona development is still a powerful tool for marketers to use. However, targeting these personas with traditional means will prove less and less effective and profitable over time. In order to create and leverage digital persona profiles, marketers must rely on technology to both capture Big Data and use it effectively. The goal of which is to get as close to one-to-one marketing as possible by delivering the right content to the correct person at the best time with the channel they prefer.

As a result, tracking and understanding a person’s digital qualities, digital movement, click data, sales funnel and preferences are important considerations for effectively identifying and building outlying digital personas. The WWE was way ahead of its time for this process.

Marketers who can best leverage digital persona development, content personalization, context marketing and Big Data will be best suited to thrive in the near future. The newer the generation, the greater the expectation is for one-on-one marketing. We can all learn a thing or two from the WWE; their model works and isn’t hard to duplicate (we have already come close to mastering it).

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Also posted in Analytics, content marketing, Content Strategy, CRM, Customer Relationship Marketing, Marketing, Physician Communications, Strategy | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Mar25

SXSW 2014: True Potential of Social Media in Healthcare Is Still Ahead of Us

sxsw logoOver a single-week period, SXSW Interactive hosts hundreds of presentations and panels. What was interesting to note this year, compared to the last few, is that a large percentage of healthcare discussions were now hosted on the stages of the two main convention centers, alongside all major celebrity keynotes.

Among many trends and ideas that were discussed, two concepts mentioned at the “What Happens When Tech and Healthcare Meet” panel were quite memorable. Although these are just mere single examples, each testified to a number of current trends in healthcare.

Concept: DermLink—a social network-based platform that allows patients to digitally share skin conditions with dermatologists and receive real-time responses.

Why this is important: This is especially relevant to those outside major metropolitan areas, where a wait to see the local dermatologist can exceed a few weeks. We’ve all heard success stories of doctors tapping into a broad pool of peers via Twitter and Facebook. But this platform is among the first controlled, social, care-specific environments that could potentially redefine the approach and expectations for doctor-patient interaction.

Bottom line: Regardless of the success of this platform, the mere fact that this platform is gaining momentum is an indicator that the true potential of social media in healthcare is still ahead of us.

Concept: Covered—a platform that helps applicants select the most appropriate health insurance by posing a series of qualifying questions in a standard, conversational language.

Why this is important: Although standard applications have been around for quite some time, we’re starting to see a shift in the way even insurance companies need to structure their communications. Over the past decade, we’ve witnessed a similar shift in practically every single aspect of marketing communication etiquette due to social media. A simple, well-timed response to a tweet can gain greater consumer loyalty than a multimillion-dollar Super Bowl ad.

Bottom line: Consumers no longer want to be talked at. They want to be spoken with. This is no longer breaking news…rather, a well-known fact. But at last it is finally beginning to change the insurance companies’ tone of interaction with potential applicants.

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Mar21

The Future of Wearables at SXSW 2014

SXSW_Logo_2013_BlackBG_CSAs you might have imagined, the conversation around wearables was booming at SXSW this year.  But they weren’t talking about FitBit or Fuelband as you might expect.  They were talking about what comes next, after we’ve quantified our surface vitals.

“I got bored with how many steps I walked every day and quickly got used to the idea that I was never doing enough,” said Tim Brown, CEO of IDEO, in a conversation-style session held with Joi Ito, Director of the MIT Media Lab.  “The amount we are starting to wear to track our vital signs is crazy, but we are moving beyond vitals very quickly,” Brown went on.

The Affective Computing group at MIT is now taking wearables deeper into ourselves than ever before with conductive skin technologies that can detect stress and, paired with complex algorithms, intuit emotions. In aggregate, Joi explained, this will grant us the ability to curate our lives in ways we couldn’t before.  Historically, our environment and circumstances were akin to a series of accidents and coincidences. The future will be much more intentional.

In the healthcare delivery space, these new technologies will help us treat and understand emotional conditions like anxiety, stress, autism, and others. “Devices like Neumitra will transform the way we think about mental health,” said Scott Stropkay, co-founder of Essential. “Mental health is about brain health, which is analogous to physical health, which can be measured and improved.”

Technologies like Neuma, a bio-sensing watch, help measure stress in real time so we can start to manage it.  Linked to a dashboard and combined with calendars or locations, we can begin to figure out what stresses us out—and what calms us. On a larger scale, we can aggregate that data to help make our communities, societies, and world an altogether less-stressful place.

But there is a moral question to all this measurement and quantification. Sometimes there are evolutionary and societal reasons for the need to deceive ourselves. After a less-than-savory meal at a friend’s house, we are conditioned to say, “dinner was great,” so as not to offend. And we are conditioned to believe it. “What’s interesting,” says Ito, “is that the subconscious always knows, we just don’t always rationalize. In a controlled, unemotional study, we can pick out the liar.”

Emotion- and stress-tracking wearables bring the sub-conscious truth about ourselves to the surface.  And how will these affect things like healthcare?  We are all familiar with the placebo affect, which works both ways. This, in fact, is the basis for the FDA ordering 23andMe, an online genetic testing service that provides ancestry-related genetic reports, to cease providing health-related reports until the FDA works through the implications and figures out how to regulate this new kind of service. “Nine out of 10 cases of type 2 diabetes can be prevented. But we spend more money treating than we do preventing,” said Ann Wojcicki, founder of 23andMe. “Everyone makes money when I am sick, but who makes money when I am healthy?”

“Twenty-seven percent of us are wearing some sort of sensor,” explained Dr. Leslie Saxon while speaking on Body Computing. “A new person—from birth until the time they are two—will have more medical record data stored in the cloud than any person who came before them.”

All of this is leading to a new kind of personalized healthcare. The kind of healthcare in which delivery mechanisms happen in real-time and enable informed decision-making.  At an aggregate level, data can aid, inform, and expedite research.

Today’s quantified wearables are a great start, but the future of wearables is contextual, environmental shaping, and behavior changing.

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Also posted in behavior change, Data, Healthcare Communications, SXSW, Wearable Health Technology | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Responses
Mar20

The Best of SXSW 2014

sxsw logoI could give you a top 10 list or a top 5 list of what was best at SXSW. That would be great if I were trying to convince you of why attending SXSW is an amazing learning experience. However, what I’d like to provide is the best single thing I learned, and get into some actionable details.

So, I was ready to get into what seemed to be a great talk. I was on line waiting, about a dozen people away from the door, when I heard, “Sorry, this session is full.” So with that news I went next door and found a talk titled, “Let’s Get Physical—Design + Embodied Cognition,” by Michael Hendrix, Partner and Creative Director at IDEO. By chance, I’d just found what was to me the best talk of SXSW.

Embodied cognition is the theory that the human mind is largely determined by the form of the human body. To simplify, the mind is experiencing the world through all our senses. The more senses that are stimulated, the more powerful the experience.

The really interesting part of this is that our minds cannot really differentiate a real experience from an imagined one. For example, when we go to the movies and experience an action-packed film, we are experiencing intense visual and aural senses. Our reaction to this fabricated experience is that we may be sitting forward in our seat, our heart rate may increase and the palms of our hands may even sweat. Our minds are telling our bodies to react to the imaginary experience as though it’s real. This is powerful stuff. The more senses we engage in an experience, the more our minds take that experience in and make it memorable.

Brands are already using this principle to design their products to convey a certain aesthetic to potential buyers. One example provided at the SXSW session was that BMW makes the hinges on their car doors heavier to convey quality and safety. People who are looking to buy a car will place a premium on a safe, well-built car.

So how does this apply to our world of marketing? Well, let’s say we are creating an iPad piece for sales reps to detail to doctors. It is common for these to include some basic ways of swiping or tapping to navigate to content. Additionally, it is the sales rep who is usually using the device. However, if we want to make this experience memorable for doctors, we should put the device in their hands and tap into more of their senses. We should think about including interesting visual and audio content. Additionally, we can use the interactive capabilities of the iPad to engage even more of the senses. For example, the iPad will recognize with its built-in gyroscope if it’s tilted or moved in a three-dimensional space, with its motion sensor if it’s shaken, or with its multi-touch screen if it’s touched with multiple fingers.

This may sound like fun and games or interaction for interaction’s sake but there is real scientific research that backs up communicating this way. The more we can tap into human senses when we communicate, the more powerful and memorable the communication will be. And remember, that goes for real and imagined experiences. This is an idea that can breathe new life into the way we think about our clients’ needs.

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Feb28

How Can Self-monitoring Best Support Behaviour Change?

3907691Some of today’s biggest public health challenges, such as obesity and  heart disease, can be linked to personal lifestyle decisions. Governments have tried tackling these issues with smoking bans and taxes on high-fat foods, with moderate success. However, personal health behaviour change is needed to make a significant, lasting impact. Can self-monitoring of health information be the answer?

Studies in diabetes, hypertension, medication compliance and weight loss have shown that patients who successfully self-monitor their activities and set personal goals enjoy improved health outcomes and better adherence to treatment 1-6. We now have an abundance of apps and wearable technology at our fingertips to comprehensively track numerous aspects of our lifestyle, analyse results and observe improvements over time. These self-monitoring tools can then be easily integrated into social health networks so that we can share experiences, track our progress against that of our peers, and give and receive advice on how to succeed.

It is estimated that there are more than 40,000 health and fitness apps available. But with this bewildering variety of choice, how can we know which ones will encourage lasting behaviour change?

Easy does it

The apps which make the process of data upload as effortless as possible for the end user are the ones most likely to catch on in the long-term. Devices that automatically record data and synchronise it with online analysis programmes in real time provide a seamless transition and are not hampered by general forgetfulness or lack of time.

Keep it simple

Health information needs to be engaging, and simple enough to be universally accessible. The average person is likely to find sorting the data that matters from what doesn’t time-consuming and intellectually daunting—in fact, many patients who have to actively monitor a condition like type II diabetes don’t always fully engage with self-monitoring for these very reasons.7

Be realistic

Establishing aspirational but realistic goals and providing reinforcing feedback can help bring self-monitoring systems to life and make them personally meaningful.  A recent study into self-monitoring to improve diabetes treatment found that the main concerns patients had with the system were disappointment with unmet expectations and difficulty fitting the programme into the demands of daily life. 1

Collaborate

Ideally, fitness or health tracking app developers should collaborate closely with specialist healthcare providers and device makers as well as social scientists who understand how to bring about behaviour change. Such cross-fertilisation could result in truly useful tools that track fitness alongside other health metrics, such as blood sugar levels or medication adherence.

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1.  Barlow J, et al. Self management approaches for people with chronic conditions: a review. Patient Education Counseling 2002;48:177–87.

2.  Benhamou PY. Improving diabetes management with electronic health records and patients’ health records. Diabetes Metab 2011;37(Suppl 4):S53–6.

3.  Dennis EA, et al. Weight gain prevention for college freshmen: comparing two social cognitive theory-based interventions with and without explicit self-regulation training. J Obes 2012;2012:803769.

4.  Parker R, et al. An electronic medication reminder, supported by a monitoring service, to improve medication compliance for elderly people living independently. J Telemed Telecare 2012;18:156–8.

5.  Ralston JD, et al. Patients’ experience with a diabetes support programme based on an interactive electronic medical record: qualitative study. BMJ 2004;328:1159.

6.  Wagner PJ, et al. Personal health records and hypertension control: a randomized trial. J Am Med Inform Assoc 2012;19:626–34.

7.  Choose Control Survey. Choosing to take control in type 2 diabetes. Available at: http://www.diabetes. org.uk/Documents/Reports/Choose_Control_report.pdf (Last accessed May 2013).

Also posted in adherence, Apps, behavior change, Data, Health & Wellness, Healthcare Communications, Patient Communications, Self-monitoring, Technology, Wearable Health Technology | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Feb26

Digital Trends Impacting US Healthcare – Infographic

In the past year, digital innovations have brought about new markets and channels for digital health interactions. This infographic is a visual mapping of the technologies and innovations which are already playing a key role in shaping the future of healthcare and the experiences and journeys which surround it.

Of course the ACA is affecting healthcare coverage, but it is also affecting our healthcare experiences by placing increased importance on and driving more frequent interactions with NPs, PAs, and Pharmacists. Additionally, more priority has shifted to consumers to educate themselves and take responsibility for their own health, especially when combined with our growing culture of social media and trust networks, and recent draft guidance from the FDA. Video remains hot, but the trending has shifted to the length of videos patients are consuming, increasing its relevance to pharmaceutical marketers. Mobile and tablets continue to grow rapidly, with and quantified self driving deeper engagement though apps, not just web. Last, but certainly not least, EHR is poised to enter the next phase of meaningful use, setting the stage for a platform shake-out as certification requirements evolve to provide more and deeper data sets to systems of connected health as providers continue to on-board.

Infographic of important technologies that impact digital healthcare marketing.

Infographic of important technologies that impact digital healthcare marketing.

Technology is evolving fast, and healthcare, believe it or not, is keeping pace and even leading the charge on many fronts. Spurred on by government mandates and initiatives, innovative organizations ranging from Google and Apple to Silicon Valley startups like Practice Fusion are quickly carrying the ball forward, sometimes struggling to keep pace with consumer expectations of today’s technology. It’s these digital healthcare innovations which have set the trends affecting us today, and will carry us forward to tomorrow.

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Feb18

Taking the Pulse…Tuning In to the New Patient Network

1741356 sA guest blog post from Craig Martin – Chief Executive Officer of Feinstein Kean Healthcare, an Ogilvy & Mather Company

Most of us are far too young to remember the early days of television. What I do recall from my childhood is that three networks owned the airwaves, large numbers of people followed a small number of notable programs, and the screen turned to fuzz at midnight. You made note of the TV Guide schedule, and you adjusted your schedule to the TV shows that interested you. The networks and the stars were in charge.

A lot has changed since then, obviously. There are now countless networks, and seemingly limitless numbers of shows. Reality television has made stars of “ordinary” people. And the digital age has made scheduled programming obsolete—the content follows you and adjusts to your life and device of choice, not the other way around.

Why wax nostalgic about the evolution of broadcast television? Because I believe a similarly dramatic transformation is under way in our field. The old channels and choices are fading to fuzz. A new era is dawning.

For years, healthcare PR relied on a few channels and reliable choices to reach, inform, and market to patients. On behalf of our clients, we used traditional media (earned and paid), events, celebrities and big disease education programs to build awareness and get patients to “talk to their doctors about…”

Today—as more of the burden of choice, comparison, and cost gets shifted to patients, as diseases become more and more categorized via genomic analysis and molecular diagnostics, as medical practice and health become more universally digitized, and physicians and pharma become more responsible for outcomes vs. treatments—the traditional big, broad-channel approaches are becoming less relevant and effective as a means of reaching more and more narrowly defined populations of patients.

These trends are leading to the establishment of entirely new channels and networks, made of up patients identified and aggregated virtually through the sharing of personal medical information and data. In other words, the audience is creating the network, and continually informing the programming through the data they share. Now, rather than casting a wide net via mass media and hoping a narrow audience will be watching, we will have ready-made networks, open 24/7, waiting if not demanding to be engaged. This opens up new frontiers for micro-targeted, real-time communication and measurable engagement, based almost exclusively on digital content and social influence.

Not long before the holidays we learned that Feinstein Kean Healthcare (FKH) and a select group of partners won a million-dollar government grant to develop a “patient-powered research network” for the multiple sclerosis community. This is an exciting development, but not because of the money. This new kind of network represents the leading edge of the transformation I’ve described, and we’re now right at the forefront as well.

In the days and months ahead, we’ll continue to evaluate the pace and progress of change, and work to assure that our thinking and services are aligned with where the world is headed. Naturally, we don’t want to get too far out ahead of the trend, but we must be informed and equipped to lead when the market is ready.

I believe, as this new era unfolds, we will find there are many exciting opportunities ahead for us to engage differently and far more meaningfully with patients.

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Also posted in adherence, advertising, behavior change, Content Strategy, Customer Relationship Marketing, Digital Advertising, Health & Wellness, Healthcare Communications, Patient Communications, Public Relations, Social Media, Technology | Tagged , , , , | 1 Response
Feb11

How Digitally Savvy Are You? See How You Would Answer the Top 10 Digital Ad Trafficking FAQs

5511521Think you are a brainiac when it comes to digital advertising?  Or do you need a quick refresher on how it all works? The true/false quiz below provides an overview of 10 frequently asked questions regarding digital advertising and the trafficking process.

Q: Most consumer and pharmaceutical websites accept the IAB standard units, also known as the Universal Ad Package: 300×250 (Medium Rectangle), 160×600 (Wide Skyscraper), and 728×90 (Leaderboard).

A: TRUE.

1-       Ad units are labeled based on dimensions (in pixels) of width x height.

2-       While the IAB recently added a fourth size to the Universal Ad Package (180×150 / Rectangle), many pharmaceutical websites have not yet implemented this unit.

Source: http://www.iab.net/guidelines/508676/508767/UAP

Q: Static backups are not required for rich media and Flash banners.

A: FALSE. Static backups are required for all rich media and Flash banner sizes.

1-       If for some reason a user’s Flash player is not functioning properly or if their browser is older and cannot handle more advanced creative assets, the static backup will be displayed in place of the Flash creative. This ensures that whenever an impression is supposed to be served for a campaign, it will be served (even if it is the static backup).

2-       Expandable rich media banners only require static backups for the smaller, unexpanded size.

Source: https://support.google.com/dfa/answer/151646?hl=en

Q: There are no file size restrictions for digital banners.

A: FALSE. Digital banners must be built in 40k or less. 

1-       Static backup banners must be under 40k.

2-       If the Flash banner cannot be built in under 40k, it must either be built as parent/child Flash or as rich media files (depends on ad functionality and client/creative agency preference).

Source: http://www.iab.net/guidelines/508676/508767/displayguidelines

 Q: To “traffic” digital ads, we (the media agency) send the creative directly to the website on which we purchased digital ads.

A: FALSE. We utilize a third-party ad server, DFA, to serve digital banners in most instances.

1-       DFA (aka DART, aka DoubleClick for Advertisers) streamlines the digital trafficking process in a few steps:

  1. We upload media placements and digital banner creative(s) into DFA
  2. We match the placements with the appropriate creative
  3. We export Ad Tags for the placements/creative above, send them to partner websites, and the sites upload them onto the webpages on which we purchased media.
  4. This is where the magic happens. As the page loads when a user visits a site, the site calls on DFA to supply the creative to be displayed in this placement. If it’s our brand’s turn to serve an impression, our creative will be displayed. If we are running multiple creatives, DFA also knows which of our creative’s turn it is based on the rotation we specified. DFA then allows us to track activity on the backend (whether a user clicks on the ad, etc.).

2-       Some websites do not allow or are not capable of accepting third-party trafficking. This is the only instance in which we would not utilize DFA to serve digital banners.

3-       For more information:

  1. http://www.google.com/doubleclick/advertisers/
  2. https://support.google.com/dfa/#topic=2485971

Q: Recommended animation length (for Flash and in-banner videos) is two minutes.

A: FALSE. Best practice and industry standard animation length is 15 seconds.

1-       It is widely believed that after 15 seconds, a user’s attention has already shifted from the banner to other parts of the site, potentially causing a decreased click-through-rate (as a user will miss the primary call-to-action if it occurs after the 15-second mark).

2-       Some websites do not have the capability to serve animation/videos that are longer than :15s; however, some sites will grant case-by-case exceptions if the animation length must be longer due to the amount of important safety information the ad is required to include.

Q: Flash is fully replaceable by HTML5.

A: FALSE. Though HTML5 is an important (and intriguing!) new tool for the creation of rich media and mobile banners, the desktop market is not yet fully prepared to serve HTML5 ads, as many older web browsers do not accept this format. If digital banners are solely built in HTML5, a brand risks frequently running static backups whenever a user’s web browser has not recently been updated.

Q: It is possible to preview a Flash (.swf) creative file without downloading the appropriate software.

A: TRUE. The Flash Validator tool allows you to upload and preview Flash (.swf) files.

1-       This tool not only allows you to preview the creative (how it looks and how the animation works), but it also shows the Flash version the ad was built in, the ad dimensions, the file size, etc.

2-       Tool: https://flashval-temp.appspot.com/validator/

Q: We can track activity on a brand’s website for users who saw our ad, but did not click.

A: TRUE. If the campaign has implemented Ad Tags and Floodlight Tags, we can track viewthrough activity in addition to post-click activity.

1-       Ad Tag—HTML tags generated by DFA and sent to the sites in a campaign. DFA generates unique tags for each placement in a campaign.

2-       Floodlight Tag—HTML code that is placed on a brand’s website to analyze consumer behavior on site after a user has clicked or viewed their ad. When a user views or clicks an ad, and then performs an activity on an advertiser’s webpage that contains Floodlight tags, DFA records and reports on that activity.

Source: https://support.google.com/dfa/topic/20441?hl=en&ref_topic=2485971

Q: Custom e-blasts cannot be tracked through a third-party server.

A: FALSE. We can track clicks on custom e-blasts through DFA if the e-blast creator/distributor includes a click-tracker (1×1) in the e-mail clickthrough URL. Note that some vendors allow and are able to include click-trackers on their custom e-blasts, and some are not.

Q: Black box products cannot run branded Smartphone banners.

A: FALSE. The new IAB Mobile Rising Stars banners allow unbranded banners to expand into branded banners.

Source: http://www.iab.net/risingstarsmobile

Have more questions? Below are a few great places to start, or feel free to reach out to anyone on the Ogilvy CommonHealth Medical Media team!

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