Sep3

Mobile in Healthcare: The Future?

Mobile Healthcare Blog ImageIn the past few years, mobile technology has changed the way consumers interact with their service providers. Whether ordering a cab to one’s exact location within minutes or getting groceries delivered in a matter of hours, there seems to be an app for everything. The healthcare industry is no exception to this trend. Mobile health data helps patients, doctors, and pharmaceutical companies in new and innovative ways.

Mobile technology is changing the way doctors and patients interact with both the healthcare system and with one another. The fitness wearables trend has put the power of transforming one’s health and body into the hands of the consumer. People use wearables and other mobile devices to get constant data feedback on their heart rate, steps, calories burned, etc. Many of these apps then organize and share this information in an easy-to-understand way, allowing consumers to make better decisions about their health. Patients can also use new apps, such as ZocDoc, which provide up-to-date appointment availability, enabling users to schedule visits with doctors as quickly and conveniently as possible. In fact, even more specific apps exist, such as Castlight, which compares prices of MRIs and other tests to find the most affordable options in a given location.1

Healthcare professionals also use a number of different apps to improve patient care and treatment. Indeed, there are entire sections of Apple’s App Store devoted to apps for doctors.2 Perhaps one of the most useful features in many of these apps is the ability to look up information right at the patient’s bedside. Quickly searching for certain symptoms can save crucial time for both the doctor and patient and may facilitate a more accurate diagnosis. Moreover, certain apps will soon offer on-the-go monitoring functionality, providing live feeds of patients’ vitals right to their doctors’ mobile devices. This continuous supply of information can optimize patient care and improve the healthcare system on a wider scale.

These mobile technologies are not just changing the way healthcare works in developed countries. Mobile has been incredibly helpful in transforming and improving the healthcare systems of many third world countries. This technology helps serve underprivileged societies by “addressing challenges such as reducing material and infant mortality rates, combatting infectious disease, creating awareness of HIV and delivering nutritional health and treatment for a variety of health conditions remotely.”3 CliniPAK360 is one app that has transformed treatment in Africa. The app works by allowing healthcare workers to input symptoms and information about a patient, which is then used to analyze and diagnose serious conditions. Other hospitals in Africa are using phones or tablets with preloaded medical information, which can be critical for saving time and effort in diagnosing and treating patients.

Mobile is also changing the way that healthcare marketers target consumers. Instead of simply “pushing pills,” companies now make their brands interactive and interesting to consumers, helping to change their brand image. Mobile apps help patients track their own health and progress and supply pharma companies with more data to effectively target consumers. Merck created MerckEngage, which provides health tracking services and has over 100,000 users from whom Merck can collect new insights and information. Geisinger Health System also launched an app on a small scale that studied “metrics like patient acceptance and treatment adherence to decide which solutions to these issues could be deployed on a broader scale” based on data they received from the app. Additionally, mobile apps can also help with medicine adherence by understanding which patients do not follow their prescription instructions and targeting them with more precise reminders. Pharma companies can leverage this data revolution to obtain the most accurate and useful marketing information yet.4

I have seen this mobile technology in my short time here at Ogilvy CommonHealth. In the past few weeks, I have helped work on an app which tracks a user’s sleep habits through either manual input or syncing up with a wearable device like Jawbone or Fitbit. This app is mutually beneficial as it helps the owners collect data on sleep habits nationwide, and helps users achieve greater awareness of their sleeping behaviors.

The central theme among all of these healthcare apps is optimization, data collection, and a better understanding of disease perception. Large databases of patient and consumer information now exist, which can be analyzed to streamline and improve patient experience, outcome, and overall health.5 It remains unclear how far these apps can take us, or if a piece of technology will ever be as good as a doctor’s intuition, but the continuing innovations provide a glimpse into the future of healthcare.

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Aug21

Helping Clients Navigate Compliant Communications for FDA-regulated Products

Helping Clients Navigate Compliant Communications for FDA-regulated Products IMAGE_EDVANITY URLS: Google Paid Search Engine Marketing (SEM) Changes
• Redirecting ad changes effective January 12, 2016
• Prohibiting ads where vanity URLs are utilized and dramatically different from the destination URL

Google has announced significant changes in their paid search engine advertising policies with regard to pharmaceutical products. The change that we are addressing here deals with vanity URLs, and their respective redirecting ads, that will take place in January 2016. The bottom line is that Google will no longer allow vanity URLs in an effort to provide consumers with more “clarity and transparency.”

Google has a long-standing policy prohibiting any ads where the destination URL differs dramatically from the display URL. Please note, this prohibition is not exclusively for pharmaceutical products—it has been Google’s practice across the board. Up until now, the pharmaceutical industry had been the exception to the rule. The reason for the exception was because in many cases, information seekers will not know the name of a drug, but will understand and know the symptoms/disease state information.

FDA background information
Previously, the FDA never objected to marketers utilizing vanity URLs and/or redirecting ads. These URLs/ads typically do not directly promote the name of a prescription product. Instead they lend themselves more to a disease state or descriptive nature, and then redirect users to another location or URL where they will see branded information specific to the prescription drug and/or disease state. Vanity URLs/redirecting ads are not exclusive to online SEM use, and are also used in print ads, television commercials, billboards, postcards, and more.
In March 2009, the FDA sent out 14 violation letters regarding search engine marketing practices of 48 brands. Thirteen of those violations referred to SEM ads running on Google. The FDA noted four types of violations in 2009:

  1. Omission of risk information, failure to meet requirements of 21 CRF 202.1(e)(5)(ii)
  2. Inadequate communication of indication
  3. Overstatement of efficacy
  4. Failure to use the required established name

Google’s reaction—what exactly is Google implementing?
Beginning in January 2016, Google will not permit pharmaceutical advertisers to have vanity URLs (such as “TreatmentforConditionX.com”) that redirect users to a BrandName.com website.

Pharmaceutical marketers will have the following options for vanity URLs:
Option 1

ConditionSymptomsGoogle-01

Sample ad showing company name as URL

Option 2
They can add “.com” to the company name.

ConditionSymptomsGoogle-02

Sample ad showing company name plus .com as URL

Option 3a (for prescription drugs, biologics, and vaccines)
They can display the phrase “Prescription treatment website” as the display URL.

ConditionSymptomsGoogle-03

Sample ad showing prescription treatment display URL

Option 3b (for medical devices)
They can display the phrase “Prescription device website” as the display URL.

ConditionSymptomsGoogle-04

Sample ad showing device display URL

All of these ads will be able to drive to pages on the brand.com or brandhcp.com website.

At the present time, this change has been instituted by Google only, and doesn’t lend itself to print, television, or other advertising mediums.

What does this mean for our clients?
Review and reassessment of live and proposed Google SEM campaigns where clients utilize vanity URLs need to be completed as soon as possible. New campaigns need to take these new rules into consideration during the tactical planning phase. Funds can be shifted to Yahoo and Bing, however there is the possibility that they may also follow suit.

Google has indicated a willingness to work with pharmaceutical clients to minimize potential negative impact to paid search campaign performance. Testing of the new formats will determine which type of units work best with various campaigns.

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Aug14

The Client’s Always Right…Except When They Aren’t

Darlene Dobry Med Mktg Blog Image EDIn a service industry, many of us live and die by the mantra, “The client’s always right.” We have long understood and served our role as agency partners and know that we need to passionately support our clients’ efforts.

But is it acceptable to challenge the clients’ wisdom and tell them from time to time that the path they want to take will not result in the best outcomes? That they should take greater risks and push themselves and their brands to greater heights? That they should not accept mediocre results when they can achieve greatness? That they should stop doing what the others are doing and break away from the pack?

Absolutely—this is our job, this is what true client partners should want and expect. We cannot simply nod our heads in approval if we truly care about our clients and the brands we support. We need to tell the truth―backed up with data, customer insights and market knowledge—and state it with conviction. When it’s out, the client will ultimately determine which direction to proceed, but they will do it knowing the potential “watch outs” or barriers to its success, and we can then work together to be armed with the ultimate plan.

It has been my experience that clients do appreciate partners who show passion, conviction and a commitment to doing what they believe is right. Most are not looking for order-takers or yes-men (and if they are, you may want to consider working with a new client).

In my office, I have a sign that says, “I’d agree with you, but then we’d both be wrong.” It’s not there to remind me that I’m always right—it’s a daily reminder to stand up for the brand and what you believe…always, even if it’s not necessarily popular. Of course, it’s critical to be able to back it up and deliver with diplomacy, grace and experience. In the end, the client drives the ultimate decision, and as their partner, we align, support them and drive to deliver the very best.

My best client relationships have been based on trust, truth and transparency, and respecting that it works both ways. There is immense power, transformative ideas and inspired problem solving that come from collective diverse thinking and challenging the status quo. Remember, in the words of David Ogilvy, “We only get a spark when the stone and flint are moving in opposite directions.”

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Aug5

Immunotherapy: Has the Answer to Cancer Been Inside Us All Along?

Immunology Blog Image EDThis year over 1.6 million Americans will be diagnosed with cancer and nearly 600,000 people will die from the disease. That’s over 1600 people each day. The need for innovative therapeutic approaches to treat cancer has never been higher. To help fight the tumor, oncologists are literally looking within at new immunotherapeutic approaches aimed at unleashing the body’s own natural defenses.

The idea of immunotherapy isn’t a new one. Since the first studies of antibodies began in 1891, researchers have continued to investigate the potential of the immune system. But the idea held little more than promise.

But all that has changed.

Numerous breakthrough advancements in immunotherapy, with unprecedented results, have propelled the entire class forward. At this year’s Annual Meeting of the American Society of Oncology (ASCO), immunotherapy took front and center. Thousands upon thousands of oncologists crammed the educational sessions for just a glimpse of some of the new data being presented, CNN ran headline news stories from the congress, and even patients are aware and asking their physicians about the new therapies being researched.

Across the board, the pharmaceutical industry has started to mobilize behind the potential of immunotherapy unlike anything else seen before. Most of the major pharmaceutical companies already have one or more new drug candidates in development—and if they don’t, they are aggressively exploring opportunities to catch up.

Over 800 Clinical Trials With Immunotherapy Products
At present there are 844 ongoing or completed clinical trials with immunotherapy drugs across a wide range of tumor types. These trials include some of the most challenging cancers associated with the worst prognoses, like lung, stomach, brain, and melanoma. And new trials with new products and new regimens are added almost daily.

$35 Billion in Projected Sales
Analysts believe that annual sales for immunotherapy products in oncology will reach $35 billion a year.

60% of Cancers Will be Treated With Immunotherapy

Researchers believe that immunotherapy may become the dominant form of treatment in oncology, with nearly two out of every three cancer patients receiving some form of immuno-based therapy within the next decade.

While these numbers are staggering, the greatest benefit may be for the patients diagnosed with cancer. The early results from the emerging next-generation immunotherapy agents have rightfully captured the hopes of both patients and oncologists. With continued research and a little luck, these treatments may provide more than a treatment for a cancer, they may offer a cure.

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Jul15

Illuminate the Customer Journey With Data and Analytics

Journey Blog Image_EDSmart integration of data can now help identify and predict customer location and movement along the customer journey continuum. Mapping the customer journey is a vital planning tool.

Mapping out customer journeys is a well-established phase of communications planning. At Ogilvy, this represents the third step in the well-regarded planning platform: FUSION. The customer journey identifies the different phases customers migrate through toward a desired behavioral change destination. The journey phase will differ in each planning effort as the preferred consumer action and marketing objective are all project specific.

Improved understanding of the different stages customers should pass through en route to the ultimate desired location helps planners marshal the right channels, messages, and content to aid the customers along their journey.

The construct around the journey-based plan addresses key questions such as:

• What is our ideal behavioral perception for audiences in a specific stage?
• What are the perceptual challenges that may hinder getting our audience to think in a particular way?
• What are the positive levers that can enhance the likelihood of our audience to respond in a desired manner?
• How do we then move our consumers to the journey’s next phase?
• What channels do we deploy, and at what times, to get our key messages across our audience?

When these are well identified, the output helps make the ubiquitous, overused, but still aspirational goal of “right message, right channel, at the right time, to the right audience,” a possibility.

The customer journey can be complex: recent studies such as McKinsey’s The Consumer Decision Journey have shown that the customer journey has grown more complex. As I have alluded to in my previous article, The Marketing Funnel is Not Dead: A Website Analogy, customers may take several complex detours, but they still have to pass through well-defined phases to proceed with their conversion. The typical phases of this journey start with brand or message awareness and proceed to stimulating interest, trial, usage, commitment, and advocacy. Customers may get caught up in a phase, or proceed rapidly through phases, or even recede at times. However, you generally need to be aware of a product before you can consider using it.

The journey currently produces robust and well laid-out plans to engage and usher consumers on the behavioral change voyage. The next step is to map real customers to each phase and deliver plans against these customers to improve the journey. Before consumer-mapping knowledge, marketers have applied satisfactory approaches including contextual marketing, which aligns messages to media content as a proxy for consumer awareness and the journey phase. Sequential messaging is another approach without mapping knowledge. This approach starts with early-phase messaging and shifts to later-stage messaging based on average phrase duration. Lastly, one could always deliver broad messages, with the hope and expectation that the audience will self-select, and engage with the messages most applicable to their journey. However, the utilization of consumer-mapping information and understanding which individuals are in each phase are preferred.

The availability of customer-level data and the ease of pooling previously unconnected data are making customer mapping a reality. Now we can identify when a customer traverses a specific phase of the journey so that we can execute the well laid-out communication plan against these customers. Data can now help us to answer questions such as who are these customers. What is the likelihood that they will try the product? How quickly will they progress along the journey? How likely are they to become a highly valuable customer? Once the customer journey has been identified, planners and analysts can identify the attributes and traceable behavioral markers that correspond to each phase. Analysts then pool together vast available customer-level data, create new variables as needed, recommend new proxy measures, and categorize customers into their corresponding phase. This is the essence of marketing smart: integrating consumer mapping (segmentation) and targeting with planning from the start.

We recently categorized healthcare professionals (HCPs) into key journey phases using combined data including scripting volume (current value), category share (opportunity), and trajectory of prescription change over time (momentum), as well as other behavioral and attitudinal markers (attributes). We identified “the trialists” as customers who have a low volume of recent activities, or have remained static in their usage patterns. “Adopters” are users on an upward momentum who overindex on usage, while “the passionate advocates” have a large volume of usage and are still increasing their volume. The passionate advocates typically index well in terms of the category’s brand share. Since we can put a face to every target HCP within the customer journey’s important stages, allows us to map the communication plan, as well as behavioral change targets, to specific customers.

A journey infused with data makes evaluating and optimizing marketing effectiveness easier. Goals and targets should be set with behavioral outcome objectives for each customer segment, which makes tracking, assessment, and adjustment more feasible. When customers traverse into the journey’s next phase, the speed and momentum can be quantified, and the effect of channels and messages can be realized. A/B testing experiments are also beneficial to identify and amplify drivers (eg, tactics, content, execution) that have proven effective in engaging and moving customers into the next phase.

In conclusion, data, and the attendant analysis, can enhance our understanding of audiences along the customer journey, thereby enhancing more relevant communication, engagement, and desired responses from our customers. Marketers who put the customer-mapping capability to better use will reap the results of increased customer velocity along the journey, better customer experience with the brand, and higher value per customer.

1 http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/marketing_sales/the_consumer_decision_journey
2 https://digitaliy.wordpress.com/2011/10/15/the-marketing-funnel-is-not-dead-a-website-analogy/

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Jul2

Does Size Always Matter?

How Pharma Engages With Its Followers Online

Social Network Blog Image_EDPharma is investing more heavily in social media than ever before; tweets are up 530% since 2013 and Twitter followers have increased by nearly 300%. So far, so good. Because more followers means more opportunities to get involved, and the more impact you make online, right?

But engaging in genuine, meaningful conversations about a corporate brand isn’t easy, and it’s important to ensure we don’t fall into the trap of focusing too much on numbers and not enough on engagement. Companies need to ensure they don’t build followers just to push out messages to anyone willing to pay attention. While people are increasingly more open to finding new knowledge on social media, they don’t want to wade through hundreds of pages of information, images or tweets to do so.

The balance between community size versus engagement is becoming more and more of a priority, and formed one of the focus areas for a recent report published by Ogilvy Healthworld, part of Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide (the health behavior specialists of Ogilvy & Mather).The report, Connecting the Dots: Which Pharma Companies Are Succeeding in the Social Media Space?, was the first of its kind to provide insights into which pharma companies are leading the way in integrated social media marketing strategies.

“We know that some pharma companies have been cautious in their approach to social media, but our report clearly demonstrates a dramatic and successful increase in activity,” said Rebecca Canvin, Social Media Manager at Ogilvy Healthworld, adding: “Social media has changed the way pharma companies communicate—it allows them to build corporate reputation and engage in genuine, meaningful conversations with audiences. For companies who want to stand out from the crowd, it’s time to be brave, get personal, educate and integrate social media into their wider marketing strategy.”

Interestingly, companies that ranked most highly in the audit weren’t necessarily those with the largest communities, but those who engaged their audiences through frequent activity. And it’s not hard to understand why the more active companies enjoy the most engagement with their followers—after all, social media in its very nature demands participation and interaction. But the companies that do it well manage to create content that is less about the organization and more about connection points or interests that followers share.

The report highlights that although the focus for pharma companies is still on building brand profile, the priority is turning to attracting, keeping and engaging with loyal followers. And to do this, the onus needs to shift to “quality over quantity.” It’s more powerful to engage with a small group of passionate followers, whether they’re consumers, doctors or media, than to blast one message to 10,000 followers and “see what sticks.”

And loyal followers will reward companies who engage continuously in this way—so really, shouldn’t we all be asking, how much does size matter?

Connecting the dots - infographic UK Post

To find out more on Connecting the Dots: Which Pharma Companies Are Succeeding in the Social Media Space? please visit: http://bit.ly/1P5R5Ws

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Jun22

Google Changes Search Ad Format For Pharma Brands

Search-For-PharmaGoogle has announced that it will be updating the Google Search ad format it offers to healthcare and pharmaceutical brands. This change affects support for pharmaceutical brands with black box warnings and those that require adverse event information as part of the ad.

URL architecture for black box brands

As of July 20, 2015, Google will be moving to a common AdWords format that no longer supports an additional line of copy and additional URL for black box brands and those requiring adverse event language. This is an evolution that is optimized for its paid search marketing solution that has been available to pharmaceutical advertisers for the last five years.

An example of how a brand might be using search engine marketing in Google AdWords before and after the July 20th update:

Pre-July 20th AdWords Example:
Brand Ad 1
Post-July 20th AdWords Example:
Brand Ad 2

 

 

 

What does this change mean for pharma brands?
Brands that are currently using Google AdWords for marketing will need to consider a rewrite of existing creative and landing pages. The pages that the new AdWords ad links to will need to prominently feature adverse events information for the product. This will require revisiting of search marketing strategies as well as potential user experience and design changes to optimize inbound traffic from paid search campaigns.

Brands currently using paid search programs with Google should leverage Google’s Sitelinks feature, which provides several links to content within a product website within the AdWords format. Product managers and agencies should also reinvest in paid mobile search with this change, as there is a broader efficiency with this change in having a single ad format for all platforms (desktop and mobile search).

Post-July 20th AdWords Example with Sitelinks:
Brand Ad 3

The changes to Google’s AdWords program will have a significant impact on pharma brand website marketing performance as well as the cost of paid search solutions currently used for search engine marketing programs. Expect to see changes in your category as well as behavioral changes for your paid and organic search performance.

Next steps
The changes to Google’s AdWords program will affect every brand using paid search for healthcare professional and consumer engagement. Work with your agency partner to identify the best counter-measures for these changes and how to recalculate your performance metrics.

Ogilvy CommonHealth offers digital strategy, content strategy, creative development, and analytics services for all of our clients to guide brand leadership through these and any future changes to search engine marketing and market changes in digital and traditional media.

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Jun11

The Next Phase of Pharmaceutical Value Propositions Needs to Include the Real Meaning of Synergy

Synergy Blog ImageExpress Scripts recently issued a report on drug spending that made some headlines in the business press.[1,2] This compelling report shows that, from the perspective of a pharmacy benefit manager (and its pharmacy claims database), evidence confirms the trends of increased drug spending, particularly in the subset of patients that consumes at least $100,000 worth of drugs annually:

• The population of patients that takes at least $100,000 worth of drugs has almost tripled from 2013 to 2014
• Compounded drugs were the 3rd highest driver of the trend, behind HCV antivirals and oncolytics
• 9 out of 10 patients with drug costs over $50,0000 used specialty medications
• Men and baby boomers (those aged 51-70) make up the majority of those with high drug costs
• Comorbidities and polypharmacy were prevalent among patients with high drug costs

Glenn Stettin, MD, the SVP of Clinical, Research, and New Solutions, outlines in this report implications and recommendations, most of which are feasible for a PBM to consider:

• Eliminate wasteful spending and improve medication adherence
• Manage specialty and traditional medications together
• Pioneer new approaches in cancer care that both offers patient access and sustains payer affordability

While these are important recommendations, there is an opportunity for pharmaceutical manufacturers to consider extending and enhancing the value propositions of their drugs, and it relates to the “comorbidities and polypharmacy” finding in this report, which is pretty remarkable. The report shows that:

• Among patients whose drug costs reached $100,000, more than one-third were treated for more than 10 conditions
• More than 60% were taking more than 10 medications
• One in four patients had prescriptions from at least 4 different prescribers
• More than half of patients with $100,000 in drug costs were prescribed medications by physicians from at least 4 difference specialty areas

Now, as we read daily in the business press, the drug industry is facing pushback about its pricing of newer agents (specifically HCV antivirals and oncolytics). This resistance from customers is normal, and has taken various forms of stricter precertifications and/or formulary requirements.[3] Recently, legal patent challenges have surfaced; in some countries, various advocates are asking that patents on drugs be voided, so that generic competitors can appear earlier.[4] Nonetheless, evolving industry forces, such as comparative effectiveness research, constrained health care budgets of some payers, and new competitors have started to create a new equilibrium between sellers and buyers, and these forces are helping to more quickly vet winners and losers. It is encouraging to see the manufacturers (particularly of HCV and cancer drugs) refine the value propositions of their drugs, which now include cures for some patients.[3]

But disease is multifactorial (and, as the ESI report shows, multiple diseases are, too), and treatments often need multiple approaches. Manufacturers may need to extend the current value proposition of “one drug that treats one disease at one time” and add it to the complicated heath care mix that includes other variables, for example:

• Combination therapies (with other drugs, including competitors and/or generics, and with other modalities such as devices, diet, surgery, etc.)
• Timing or sequence of treatments (ie, phase of the disease)
• All of the factors in “care coordination” (ie, different physicians, different specialties, different settings)

In other words, manufacturers need to demonstrate the synergy produced by their drugs. “Synergy” is often misused, but I like the Merriam-Webster definition of synergy as “a mutually advantageous conjunction or compatibility of distinct business participants or elements (as resources or efforts).”[5] Certainly some treatment guidelines, pathways, and medical policies attempt to address these multiple variables in health care. But manufacturers can bring their significant credibility in clinical research and patient experience to identify, define, and demonstrate the specific opportunities that optimize their drugs’ performance. They are best-suited to do so, and the customers are receptive to that type of message. (Note: as this heads to posting, 2 manufacturers are reported to have taken this approach and are studying their oncology drugs in combination.[6])

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Footnotes:

1. Super Spending: US trends in high-cost medication use. May 2015. http://lab.express-scripts.com/insights/drug-options/super-spending-US-trends-in-high-cost-medication-use. Accessed May 19, 2015.

2. Growth of patients with $50K annual drug tabs skyrockets. Fierce HealthFinance. May 17, 2015. http://www.fiercehealthfinance.com/story/growth-patients-50k-annual-drug-tabs-skyrockets/2015-05-17). Accessed May 19, 2015.

3. Gilead’s $1,000 Pill Is Hard for States to Swallow. The Wall Street Journal. April 8, 2015. http://www.wsj.com/articles/gileads-1-000-hep-c-pill-is-hard-for-states-to-swallow-1428525426. Accessed May 21, 2015.

4. High Cost of Sovaldi Hepatitis C Drug Prompts a Call to Void Its Patents. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/20/business/high-cost-of-hepatitis-c-drug-prompts-a-call-to-void-its-patents.html. Accessed May 20, 2015.

5. Merriam-Webster Online. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/synergy. Accessed May 21, 2015.

6. AstraZeneca and Lilly to test new cancer drug combination. Reuters. May 29, 2015. http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/05/29/us-astrazeneca-eli-lilly-cancer-idUSKBN0OE0HU20150529. Accessed May 29, 2015.

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May28

Satisfying Patient Needs Across Generations via Patient Portals

When it comes to healthcare, patients from the “Greatest Generation” to Millennials want three things: 1) a strong patient-physician relationship, 2) easy-to-understand healthcare information, and 3) this information? preferably in a digital format. How do we accomplish all three? Before we answer that question, let’s take a look at how different generations access healthcare information.

Monica Wong Blog Image

The “Greatest Generation” (Age 65+)
While almost 60% of people ages 65 and older use the Internet on a daily basis, this generation of patients are heavily influenced by their doctors when it comes to recommendations, health information and referrals. However, children and caretakers of this generation, Baby Boomers, may also play a role in making these decisions on behalf of the “Great Generation.”

Baby Boomers (Age 45-65)
While this generation is also influenced by physicians, Boomers are more likely than the “Greatest Generation” to research their options, challenge assumptions and rely on peer-to-peer conversations to make their healthcare decisions. 79% of Baby Boomers go online every day or almost every day. A Google/Nielsen Boomer Survey also reported that 78% of Baby Boomers have searched for health information after seeing something on TV. Baby Boomers also influence healthcare decisions of their Gen X and Millennial children.

Gen X (Age 30-45)
According to research done by Smith & Jones Healthcare Marketing, Gen X are only moderately responsive to healthcare advertising. Since this generation is the first to experience the digital age, Gen X shops for healthcare like they do for retail goods and services. They are partial to TV and in-office messages compared to other forms of marketing channels, but they also have a tendency to search for ratings and reviews online, as experience matters to them.

Millennials (Age 20-30)
Like Gen X, Millennials highly value positive patient experiences. They are young and healthy and as a result, they mainly use healthcare for primary care, urgent care and OB/GYN. Online advertising, TV and in-office messages are the best ways to reach them close to the care decision. Millennials seek information from a variety of sources, including online, social networks and word of mouth.

Satisfying Patient Needs Across Generations With Patient Portals
What do these generations of patients all have in common? They want positive patient experiences with their physicians. They want information they can easily understand and they want easy access to it online. So how do we satisfy these needs? Patient portals. Why? Because increasing positive patient outcomes and experiences begins with making physicians more accessible when patients have concerns. Physicians can distribute timely and relevant information to their patients on a digital platform that can be accessed 24/7. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, 41% use portals for secure messaging, 35% use them for patient education, and 30% use them for prescribing medications and scheduling appointments.

How Can Marketers Leverage Patient Portals?
By repurposing existing healthcare marketing material and creating a depository for digital assets, these resources can be made available to HCPs who can then share these assets with their patients. Their patients will likely be more receptive to information as it is coming from a trusted source, their physicians, and through a channel they have easy access to. However, there are limitations.

Opportunities to Take Patient Portals to the Next Level
For elderly patients, additional features like the ability to increase portal font size is a simple fix. For digital natives, mobile-optimized portals can facilitate prescription refills and requests as well as schedule appointments. For non-native English speakers, portals available in different languages can dramatically improve patient services. But for those who do not have access to the Internet, we’ll have to find a way to close that gap. If you have any thoughts, please share in the comments below.

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Also posted in Analytics, Data, Design, Digital, Digital Advertising, Health & Wellness, Technology, Wearable Health Technology | Leave a comment
May19

Wearable Wonder: Will They Improve Patients’ Quality of Life?

LeanneLakeBlogImageSizedClearly wearables are “all the buzz” in our industry. Soon our Fitbits, watches and the like will become an essential part of connected healthcare, monitoring our bodies and feeding important data about our health to the cloud to be analyzed by our healthcare professionals. More data in, better outcomes come out—it’s fantastic news. But what if these devices can go the next step and actually respond to the data they are monitoring? Can you envision a future where a wearable device can improve our body’s function and a person’s quality of life in real-time? I recently learned about one that just might.

It’s called the WAK, short for the Wearable Artificial Kidney. This wearable innovation has the potential to be truly life-changing for the more than 400K patients with end stage renal disease who are currently undergoing hemodialysis every day in our country.

For the majority of these patients, treatment is their lifeline, but it can also take over their life. Hemodialysis patients receiving treatment in centers spend on average 4 hours a day, 3 days a week completely immobile—tethered to a chair, tied to a machine. Much like chemotherapy, the treatment that is saving them often makes them sick for hours afterward. In the absence of a successful transplant, they will undergo dialysis until the end of their life.

The WAK is designed to help patients get out of the chair and back into life. It is a miniature battery-powered dialysis device that is worn like a tool belt. It is connected to the patient by a catheter, weighs approximately 10 pounds and offers dialysis 24/7. Some experts believe that in a perfect world, more frequent dialysis would yield better control, however this comes with a tremendous burden to the healthcare system. If proven successful, the WAK could improve outcomes and deliver new hope for patients, reducing their time in the chair and giving them the mobility to go about activities of daily life—a more “normal” existence. The FDA fast-tracked the WAK, and it is currently undergoing its first human trial in the United States. Human clinical trials conducted in Italy and London already concluded successfully.

For me, following the progress of this wearable technology is personal. I lost my dad to end stage renal disease and its complications three years ago this June. During the five years he “survived” on dialysis, I watched his body and spirit wear thin. Early on, the dialysis center gave him the personal connection he needed to share with patients having a similar experience, but soon after getting into the three-day-a-week routine, he and my mom longed to get back the flexibility that every retired person deserves. The ability to hit the driving range with his buddies on a Tuesday, attend his grandson’s football game on a Thursday, or even make the trek to NJ to visit me and my family on a Saturday afternoon.

Looking back, I wonder how the WAK would have changed my dad’s dialysis experience and the burden it placed on both him and my mom.

What’s your wearable wonder?

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Also posted in adherence, Apps, behavior change, Culture, Data, Design, Digital, Health & Wellness, Patient Communications, Self-monitoring, Technology, Wearable Health Technology | Tagged | Leave a comment