Oct29

Exploring the Programmatic Opportunity in Healthcare Professional Media

JS Blog2You don’t have to be an expert in the intricacies of programmatic media buying to understand the rapid adoption of this latest innovation in the online advertising space. According to a recent AOL survey, 76% of advertisers buy display banners via programmatic across all industries and an estimated 9.5% of the total online media investment is being bought programmatically (WFA Survey, Aug 2014). Quite simply, large-scale advertisers have realized many benefits. Recognizing the potential, Ogilvy CommonHealth Medical Media first started offering the option to our medical advertising clients back in 2012 via our in-house Demand Side Platform (DSP) technology. Four years later, we review the fundamentals of the technology and the potential benefits to professional medical advertisers, while discussing the unique market conditions our industry faces that have hindered adoption. Ultimately, we ask, “Is programmatic buying right for advertisers looking to reach busy medical professionals?”

What Is Programmatic Buying?

Making banner buys programmatic simply means automating the process via a “machine” called a Demand Side Platform (DSP). Banner buys can be programmatic with or without the element of bidding (real-time bidding, or RTB), in which case two or more advertisers compete simultaneously for the same impression, with the win going to the highest bidder. The “machine” or technology not only automates the buying process, it analyzes first- and third-party data feeds to define custom audiences and then finds these targets as they move throughout the web via banner impressions available through ad exchanges. The DSP is a comprehensive solution that assists buyers by managing data, inventory and bids.

What Is the Opportunity?

The immediate opportunity for industry is to exponentially increase brand exposure and reduce costs by targeting healthcare professionals as they move across the web, beyond pure play medical sites such as Medscape and MedPageToday. The professional medical media sector continues to rely primarily on the direct 1:1, agency: publisher buying model. Given that most medical sites have a limited supply of inventory, banner CPMs are high, often averaging over $100.00 ($250.00-$350.00 for targeted banners) and premium publishers sell out of annual inventory very quickly. The DSP model solves the inventory supply problem and simultaneously yields cost-efficiency gains. With the ability to serve banners across the web to a qualified audience, we have realized CPMs downward of $20.00.

What Are the Challenges?

In the highly regulated pharma sector, we can expect to encounter challenges with the prospect of reaching a physician on ESPN.com or other nonclinical environment. Privacy concerns have been paramount but not insurmountable. Many leading pharma and medical publishers have revisited registration and opt-in language on their websites in order to broaden the use of captured data. Even when site categories are tightly constricted to news, weather and travel sites, control over ad placement and content adjacency may be compromised, which can lead to concerns for brand safety. Additionally, regulatory teams remain apprehensive around serving HCP-targeted creative on consumer-centric, nonmedical sites.

If the DSP only tapped into medical inventory, these challenges could be better addressed. However, the fundamentals of programmatic buying would be turned upside down, negating many of the benefits:

  • Scale: Inventory on medical sites is limited and finite.
  • Quality: As the stewards of physician member/user data, premium healthcare publishers such as medical societies will not relinquish inventory to an exchange.
  • Efficiency: CPMs could easily surge to over $400.00 to reach the most productive physicians.
  • Demand: There is a definite cap on what professional media buyers are willing to pay for banners as a tactic—regardless of who could potentially see the ad.

Our Viewpoint

In order to realize the efficiencies of programmatic buying against a professional medical audience, advertisers must work with a partner that can tap into large-scale general market ad exchanges while validating targets on the physician level. This would provide the inventory scale needed to drive CPMs down but ensure a professional message is delivered to an appropriate audience.

Despite ongoing buzz around the launch of an industry-specific programmatic buying platform whereby HCP publishers would exclusively place inventory they are willing to sell via automation with a single media buying agency, the concept has not yet been realized. Full-service media agencies have programmatic capabilities, and given that quality, transparency and neutrality would be compromised in such a scenario, there seems little incentive for media buyers at large to work through a third-party media buying agency. The key questions:  How would advertisers be assured they had a fair bid for the most premium inventory, and how would optimizations across multiple campaigns be neutrally managed, given the size of the audience?

As discussed, retargeting professionals strictly on medical sites has some challenges. Even so, medical publishers willing to try programmatic selling on their sites should continue to work directly with all media agencies, but offer programmatic direct deals. This type of transaction closely mirrors a direct 1:1 digital sale since the inventory and pricing are negotiated and guaranteed. However, elements of the buy are automated from the RFP through campaign management. Neutrality, quality, control and transparency would remain intact, as media buyers would not be required to buy via a third-party agency and the publishers could maintain control over ad messaging, placement and user data on their sites.

There is certainly room in the medical media sector to innovate. But given the unique characteristics of our market, going programmatic may not translate into greater banner revenue for medical publishers if demand is weak and advertisers are not willing to participate due to inflated CPMs. Specialized medical publishers would be better served to innovate offerings beyond banner advertising—lead generation, native advertising, and real-time dynamic content opportunities are just a few that are long overdue.

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Oct22

Epic Tales of Marketing Storytelling

Story Telling BLOGStorytelling in marketing isn’t new. In fact, brand stories have anchored some of the best marketing, advertising, and public relations campaigns since the invention of, well, brands.

Marketers love stories, and not just because stories position their brand in a positive scenario. Us marketing types are creative and want to express ideas and touch emotions. We want to motivate and inspire and engage on a level that transcends a sale. We want to be storytellers.

There’s that, and then there’s what we actually end up doing.

Look, we love our brands. Really and truly. We spend hours thinking about how to get other people to love them the way we do. We get mugs and t-shirts printed that feature our logos.

So why do we end up telling such lame marketing stories? Maybe it’s because we’re not thinking about what makes a great story.

Let’s consider two important points about storytelling, one about marketing stories, and analyze them all through the lens of a blockbuster movie.

  1. Stories are about people, not events, or objects.
  2. Stories are about people’s problems and how those problems get resolved.
  3. Marketing stories should be about solving people’s problems.

Let’s unpack these three simple points and talk about what they mean for us as healthcare communicators.

 

Stories Are About People

You can tell a story about an unsinkable ship that sinks, and it’s very interesting and ironic. Or you can tell a story about Rose and Jack and their tragic love affair, and you have Titanic.

The first one is an interesting historical story, but the second one is about storytelling. Titanic took an epic event (with an ending we already knew) and made it about people. There were 2,223 passengers on the Titanic, but in the end, we cared about two people. Two.

Titanic worked because it established the main characters as people. You cared about them deeply. And when the inevitable end approached, you hoped for their safety, since you knew that at least some people survived the Titanic.

Highly simplified? Sure, but you know that a story about a ship that sinks is only as interesting as the people who survived and those who perished. It’s a people story, not a boat story.

 

Stories Are About People’s Problems

Jack and Rose clearly have a few problems, which is important. Without conflict, there’s really no story. Conflict raises the stakes and makes a story interesting.

Once we’re invested in the characters, we’re rooting for their survival. We care about the people and want them to survive, fall in love, and share this epic story. For a while there, we think they might just make it.

We know what happens to the ship, which is historically significant. We care about the people on the ship, but not the wealthy investors who made it.

The only stories that matter are about the people trying to survive. Once the characters are established, then the conflicts and resolution matter. If you set up a character, establish what they want, and create conflict, you have the basic building blocks of a story. Your reader or viewer will want to know how they resolve the conflicts. This creates tension and interest.

 

Marketing Stories Should Be About Solving People’s Problems

Titanic could have been a fictional film about an epic rescue. A modern Hollywood version might have featured a dramatic, climactic scene where Jack and Rose escape just as the Titanic sinks to a watery grave. With explosions, a smart-aleck kid, and a dog. And more explosions.

Audiences are wired for happy endings. We want the hero to survive. We want to see the villain get proper comeuppance. We want all of the loose ends to be tied up. We like to release endorphins.

In an ultramodern version, the hero might save the day in a Dodge Hellcat. We’d be okay with that and would even forgive the product placement if it worked for the story.

 

What It Means for Pharma Marketers

If Titanic teaches us anything, it’s that you can find a compelling, relatable story almost anywhere. Great writing, acting, and directing made you care about the people and their problems. You knew exactly what happened with the Titanic voyage, and yet you stuck around for 194 minutes to see how the STORY ended.

In pharma, we are dealing with life and death and health and conflict and resolution and hope and everything else that makes a great story. It’s all right there. From the scientist who toiled in a lab to create a new molecule to the patient with an untreatable disease. The clinical trials and the brave patients with nothing to lose. It’s the doctor willing to try a new drug on a desperate patient. Every step of the process has a dramatic story about people who overcome challenges to reach a goal.

It makes that little pill sitting in the palm of your hand more than just a brand. It highlights will, determination, and effort to bring this pill to market—something of a modern miracle.

Pharma marketers who want to tell a compelling marketing story are often skipping over the really interesting parts of storytelling. We spend so much time talking about the facts that we forget sometimes to talk about what it means to people. Behind every treatment, there are hundreds of amazing human stories that will never be told.

We are fortunate to be in a business where we actually get to help people. The products and solutions that we represent can change lives or even save lives. You are part of a chain of important people who are aligned to get the right treatments in the hands of someone very important. Every patient matters to someone, and we’re part of a treatment that matters deeply to them personally.

We have a responsibility to accurately explain how our drugs work, how they are dosed, and what kinds of side effects patients can expect. We’re very good at fact-based communications. There’s always a need for clear articulation of features and benefits, and we’ll never stop doing that.

But we are in the health-behavior business. We’re in an industry where early diagnosis can mean the difference between life and death. We can tell stories that will help motivate people to talk to a healthcare professional, learn about their treatments, and be compliant with their doctors’ recommendations. Facts and figures may work for some patients, but for others, not so much. If straight ol’ facts motivated people, we’d have 100% compliance.

Storytelling is the bridge from understanding to motivation. It’s the missing link between feeling a lump and seeing a doctor. It’s the difference between taking medication as prescribed and taking a drug holiday.

We know great stories and can learn how to be more effective storytellers. But we need to go beyond the label…to dig deeper to show how real people with real problems are being helped by our brands. We don’t even need to create fictional characters. We have patients, caregivers, doctors, researchers right in front of us, ready to tell their story.

Not too long ago, our team had the opportunity to interview the scientists who have dedicated their careers to cure cancer. These are top researchers with multiple degrees, and they could work anywhere in the world. Yet, they have devoted their considerable brain power to looking for a cure to cancer. It was amazing to sit with them and hear their personal stories. These scientists could do almost anything with their careers, yet something deeply personal brought them to the research bench in an attempt to cure cancer.

Every one of those scientists has a fascinating personal story that fuels their professional passion. As readers and viewers, we love stories about dedication, focus, and vision. We devour these “genius who changed the world” stories, yet we rarely articulate them as part of the brand story. These behind-the-scenes stories should be part of the unique brand narrative.

If you love your brand, and you know that you do, find the stories that matter. There are amazing, true stories on both sides of the exam table. Introduce the world to these people and help them tell their stories. If they are alive today because of your brand, let them tell their own story. We will care, we will be motivated, and we will take action.

Great stories have started revolutions and toppled governments. Stories have inspired people to take action, to pursue their dreams, or to just improve their own lives. Storytelling is at the root of our human experience.

Behavior is not static. It can be changed, but we need to give people motivation. Great storytellers know how to create characters, articulate their motivation, and put them into a conflict where they must make a decision.

Health behavior is not static either. We can find the stories that will touch people on an emotional level, engage them, and get them to take action. And that may be something as simple as taking your prescription every day.

It’s time to start telling better stories. Lives depend on it.

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Also posted in behavior change, Branding, content marketing, Content Strategy, Creativity, Culture | Tagged | 1 Response
Oct14

Learning From a Physician First Hand

Kareem Blog ImageMy name is Kareem Royes and I just completed my first year in medical school. I’ve had the opportunity to return to OCHWW Planning this past summer. Over the past year, I have worked very closely with different physicians in the hospital setting, which has allowed me to gather some new insights that I am happy to share about one of OCHWW’s biggest customers, the healthcare professional (HCP). These insights can drive tactics that will not only improve our customers’ experience, but also maximize our clients’ ROI.

Insight 1: Physicians have an inherent distrust of sale reps

One key insight medical planners and marketers frequently do not consider is that physicians have distrust for the information provided to them by drug sales reps. HCPs do not think sales reps have the medical education and years of clinical practice to tell them how to use a drug. Physicians almost unanimously prefer to obtain information from other physicians who are experts and researchers in the therapeutic area of interest. As such, there is a tremendous opportunity to improve our clients’ penetration into these practices by leveraging more physician experts, also known as “thought leaders” or “key opinion leaders,” to provide detail through webinars to physicians who are not open to speaking with sales reps.

Insight 2: The whole is more important than the individual part

We are currently in the era of using apps to enhance our day-to-day experience and interactions. This is no different for HCPs, most of whom also use smart devices. In tactical planning, we often pitch ideas around creating apps that educate physicians about a drug, or a disease, or help them follow up with care for a patient with only one disease. The flip side to this is that on average, each physician will have 2,000 patients in his or her practice and will treat over a 100 diseases. Therefore, our challenge is to convince physicians that using an app that is niched to provide care for only one disease or patient will add value to their experience. Again there is a tremendous opportunity for agencies to work with their clients to create apps that provide a more holistic experience for the physician. Physicians are more likely to engage and frequently use an app if it will cover multiple therapeutic areas and drugs, or can accommodate a significant portion of the patients in their practice.

Insights 3: Always vow to do no harm

The healthcare industry is currently transitioning to the use of electronic medical records (EMRs). The ultimate goal is to increase proper recordkeeping, increase the efficiency of the healthcare system, and facilitate physicians’ communicating better within different specialties when caring for patients. One of the frequent asks we get from our clients is, how can we penetrate EMRs to keep our products top of mind for physicians? Well there is no simple answer to this question. The technology is relatively new but it has a lot of potential to keep our clients’ brands top of mind. Opportunities exist to provide “pop-up” alerts about a drug when certain information is entered into the EMR. This can certainly help keep our clients’ drugs top of mind when a physician is filling out a patient’s chart. However, because physicians sometimes consider EMRs to be burdensome to their practice, agencies’ penetration into this space should be seamless, without adding any burden to physician practices.

Recently I was able to integrate these findings into the brand plan for a drug in the oncology space. Our client tasked us with developing three big ideas that would drive their business, considering a strong competitive landscape with increases in the barriers to accessing physicians. To address this, we proposed:

  1. Physician expert videos that could be leveraged on the drug website and on a YouTube channel where physicians could learn from experts about the drug. This allows physicians to hear from experts on their own time without adding significant burden to their workday.
  2. Leveraging EMR alerts to inform drug sales rep when a doctor has a new patient. This allows reps to detail physicians about drugs when it is immediately relevant in practices that are amenable to rep visits.
  3. And finally, to help differentiate the drug from its competitor, we proposed an unbranded platform which leverages the use of an app to provide all the relevant information about treating the cancer and all the drugs available for this cancer. This provides a more robust app that physicians are more likely to engage with and use repeatedly.

Overall our ideas were well received, and we are currently in the processing of fine-tuning the ideas to determine feasibility for next year. Stay tuned!

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Oct9

Fire All Your Reps

Fire All Your Reps Image BlogOkay, that may be a bit extreme. But marketing drugs to HCPs is no longer a guarantee of sales.

As the US healthcare system has shifted its focus from “fee-for-service” to the dual goals of increasing quality while decreasing cost, the power of the individual HCP has been on the decline. Centralized systems of care (ACOs, IDNs, large hospital systems or physician group practices) function to meet these goals by implementing standard methods of delivering care, that the individual provider executes—including the menu of drugs he or she has to choose from, and when.

Consider the September 24 Wall Street Journal article detailing the refined sales strategy that pharma companies are taking. Focusing on the sales call of a “key account manager” to a large system administrator (rather than the 2,600 doctors within the system), the article details much of the impact that pharma is seeing from the changes to our healthcare system. As insurers and the federal government increasingly implement payments based on the effectiveness of care, large systems take control of how care is delivered to manage the costs. A handful of decision-makers at these organizations control how care is delivered—eradicating the influence of the rep on the prescribing doctor.

Pharma has already shifted away from the sales rep who makes the pitch to the doctor. Consider the information from ZS Associates, a consulting firm: 50% of the doctors in the US are considered “access restricted” in some way, and in 2005 pharma companies employed over 100,000 sales reps—which is down to 63,000 in 2014.

While the role of the individual provider has become less influential, the sales rep still has a role to play. Pharma’s marketing and sales approach needs to mimic what its customers are doing—coordinating efforts across all levels and locations of care, and providing targeted support at the pivotal interaction points. Pharma companies have piloted and implemented these integrated sales teams at key locations, and their prominence will only increase as HCP access continues to decline. As emerging delivery models become more sophisticated, the traditional “clinical data” approach will become only a small piece of the drug value story, while economics, efficiency, care coordination, adherence and wrap-around support share the spotlight.

So fire all the reps? No. But we need to redefine their role to better support the new world we live in.

 

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Sep15

Responsive Web Design in Pharma

CREATIVE MOBILE BLOG PHOTO2Data is showing that we are using smartphones more and more for everyday items—searches, purchasing consumer products, travel, weather, and World Cup updates, just to name a few.

We also see smartphone users searching on prescription drugs. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) are using mobile more in their practices, yet the branded drug websites are not optimized for viewing on their phones. We see this as a missed opportunity to provide the information need to the device being used.

 

In the pharma space, we are seeing an uptick with websites moving to a responsive design methodology with consumers—but not with HCPs. We need to understand how HCPs are using their device in the office. By thinking mobile first, we can better serve their needs. Focusing on the user experience with information architecture and content strategy, we can provide the right information to the user, spanning across multiple devices.

 

This would be extremely helpful for our HCPs. If I need to look up a dosing chart for a specific drug while in the exam room, I should be able to use my mobile device to view and interact with the chart. Later, when moving to the desktop, I should have the same content and experience.


RWDP

The chart to the left is a good example to see how content can be organized from the desktop to smartphone. Take note of the design grid and how it responds to device screen sizes.

 

A good example in the pharma space is Forum Pharmaceuticals (forumpharma.com). Simple, easy to navigate, and the experience stays with you through the multiple devices. This makes for a happier end user.

 

 

 

 

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Sep11

Are Apple’s new offerings really ready for healthcare?

RPBLOGApple fans were waiting with bated breath for this week. And in usual Apple style, the company did not disappoint the vast numbers of people who eagerly sat through a staged presentation of the new products Apple will be foisting upon us in the next six months.

The new iPhone 6 is a sleeker, stylish phone with a bigger screen, a plethora of new groundbreaking apps such as Apple Pay, and powerful technology that could make the phone even more personal than it is now.

And as if that were not enough, Apple provided a double-whammy by showcasing the new Apple Watch, a truly innovative and stylish mini device that will change the simple task of telling the time.

With these two new devices, Apple also began to stake a claim in the health and wellness arena.

Let’s take the phone. It comes bearing the next generation of Apple’s powerful M chip—the M8. This chip enables Apple to turn the iPhone into a fitness tracker. The next generation motion coprocessor and sensor will know whether you’re riding a bike, running, or speed walking. It will also be able to estimate distance as well as how far you’ve gone. Finally, it will track elevation, thanks to its very own barometer, which will pick out your relative elevation by measuring air pressure.

All of this data will be collected by the new HealthKit app with powerful and intuitive dashboards and displays to help the owners of the device to begin tracking and analyzing all manner of activities.

The Apple Watch enters a largely unregulated personal health tracker business, taking on Fitbit, Jawbone, and other wearable devices. This is a powerful device. It is a pedometer, a heart-rate monitor, and it comes with a robust array of fitness tracking features, including “rings” to track your movement.

The Move ring will track your normal amount of activity, such as walking. The Exercise ring will track all manner of exercise routines, and the Stand ring will measure how long you stand or sit during the day.

But the watch also becomes your personal coach and will give you customized reminders to reach fitness goals. It will have its own Workout app, which will measure calories, time spent working up a sweat, and a variety of other activities. Finally, it will also gently nag or encourage you toward doing things more slowly than you planned. All of this will be shared with the HealthKit app.

Apple plans to offer a sports version of the watch, which comes with an alloy case that’s 60 percent stronger than the regular version.

The Apple Watch looks like it will become a serious contender in the fitness tracking market, but the steep pricing may make other fitness trackers more appealing to people.

From a regulatory perspective, the Apple Watch, while not being deemed a medical device by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), will be watched closely. The personal health data collected by individuals for their own use is outside the federal laws controlling the use of patient information.

This collection of data opens up a debate on privacy, and as this is health-related data, there will be extra scrutiny on how this data is collected and used, and more importantly, who has access to it.

However, the Feds are closely watching this fast-growing market. The FDA has already issued a list of mobile applications it is watching closely. The list includes software used by individuals to track and log personal data on exercise, food consumption and sleep patterns, and to make suggestions about health and wellness.

The major issue for privacy advocates will be how this personal data is used by the device makers and developers of apps. How marketing uses this data for profiling and targeting will become a place for regulators to identify safeguards.

Apple is also doing its bit and has made it clear to developers of health apps that it wants to protect privacy. This comes on the heels of the broadly covered celebrity hacking debacle that occurred a few weeks ago, opening up a debate about the collection and backup of data from mobile devices that synchronize with the cloud.

Last week, Apple updated its guidelines for health app developers, stating that apps working with HealthKit may not use the personal data gathered for advertising or data-mining uses other than for helping manage an individual’s health and fitness, or for medical research.

The guidelines also say that app developers cannot share data with third parties without the user’s consent.

It will be interesting to see how the FDA, as well as privacy bodies in the more stringent and regulated environments in Europe, deal with the brave new world that Apple is forging for us.

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Aug27

Isn’t Patient Centricity What Pharma Has Been Doing for Years?

TinaWoodsGraphic2Patient centricity is the new buzzword. Most of our pharma clients have patients at the heart of their corporate vision and mission, and say that the patient voice drives everything that they do. But what does it really mean to be truly patient centric?

At the recent EyeforPharma Patient Summit in London, there was a lot of talk on organising companies around patients rather than brands. And this is not surprising given that a true understanding of patients’ day-to-day needs and how they behave in the real world, as opposed to trial conditions, is critical to developing successful new products over the long term.

As digital channels, including mobile and social media, continue to democratise communication networks, pharma cannot afford to pay lip service to the increasingly powerful patient voice. They need to get used to the idea of patient opinion leaders shaping the future via patient-driven networks. For example, developing patient champions who will talk about their illness will be essential in establishing disease awareness.

The notion of supported self-management and how pharma should/could be involved is a hot topic. It is important to develop integrated, personalised patient support programmes to facilitate quality interaction between patients and stakeholders (including caregivers and family members) along the patient journey. The goal should be to provide innovative solutions around patient needs and wants—to deliver an improved patient experience, addressing patients’ individual beliefs, behaviours and goals as they are on their personal and emotional journey.

Meaningful patient insight is at the heart of any patient-centric strategy. Understanding the lived patient experience, “walking in the patients’ shoes,” is the key to deriving these insights. Anything else is just observation. Unless they have been patients themselves, even healthcare professionals are merely observers and cannot truly understand the lived patient experience.

True patient centricity is in the process of being defined, not by pharma, nor by healthcare professionals, but by the patients themselves. Is it any wonder that people are saying that “true patient engagement is the blockbuster drug of the century”?

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Aug21

Adherence Is a Dirty Word

Adherence Picture BlogInstant gratification is not fast enough.

That’s the short answer to what derails (or drives) patient engagement. It’s simple really—you’re asking someone to change their routine, visit the doctor, spend their money, change their lifestyle—for something that doesn’t necessarily have a recognizable payoff tomorrow.

We design programs, apps, and all kinds of resources to “encourage adherence,” but they may only add to this burden. So what, exactly, is that burden?

Try it yourself.

That’s what patient educator and advocate Catherine Price (@catherine_price) has folks do. Dubbed the Tic Tac Challenge, participants use Tic Tacs as placebo pills, to see what it REALLY takes to remember to take your meds.

I organized a small Ogilvy Payer “Adherence Challenge” among my Payer, Creative and Shared Service colleagues, with the help of our fabulous summer interns. In the true spirit of a new prescription, each person got a script (with varying dosing regimens) which was filled at the “intern pharmacy.” Some scripts even had a prior authorization (PA) hurdle, which required a trip to our Director of Operations to answer SOX questions, to mimic the health plan benefits investigations and appeals process.

So how did we do?

Well. I didn’t even fill my script. The PA hurdle I landed with proved too great a barrier in my schedule.

Others’ success ranged from “almost compliant except for one travel day” to sporadic compliance, and some reported back compliance—but only on workdays when it fit into a routine. Variations on time of day, taking with food, or polypharmacy had a noticeable impact on the adherence burden. While some had routines or other reminders to help them along, no one was 100% compliant. With so much going on in our lives, it’s no wonder it’s easy to forget.

 

What’s the answer?

Well, there is no single solution. Merely knowing that “you have to” is not enough. There needs to be a reason you WANT to take a pill every day. Health needs to be integrated into life, not an add-on to it. HCPs need to speak the language of their patients— à la shared decision-making—to truly engage patients toward the benefit that adherence gives them in their life. Technology, while helpful, cannot solve everything for the unmotivated patient (hit that snooze button again!). Far-off benefits are strongly outweighed by what the patient needs/wants/feels right now.

For us, this is just something to keep in mind as we design apps, resources and CRM programs. Simple, integrated, and aligned with the patient’s goals is the mantra I will be marching forward with. A patient cannot just be adherent (a supporter or follower). Instead, a patient must be an enthusiast—active in his or her health interests.

 

These insights came from my attendance at the Patient Adherence & Access Summit this past June. If you would like the full write-up from the summit, just shoot me an email and I’ll happily send it over!

claire.pisano@ogilvy.com

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Aug13

Courtesy: A Workplace Essential

Thank You TypewriterThe rules of courtesy were programmed into my brain from a young age. The power of “please” and the testimony of “thank you” are the gods of courtesy, but like all greatness, there’s more than meets the eye. These words represent the beginning and the end of all things courtesy. Just as in life, the most important parts of courtesy are not the beginning (please) or the end (thank you), but what happens in between.

Growing up playing sports showed me how to work with others in the pursuit of something greater than myself. Working at OCHWW over the last few months has shown me that my coaches prepared me for what most new college grads consider “real life” more than I thought. At an advertising agency, everyone relies on others to accomplish their goals. The creative team might be the players on the ice (I played hockey), and the account team might be the coaches. Without these two teams working in tandem, the work does not get completed. If the creatives are the players and the account teams are the coaches, then the clients are the general managers and owners. All are in the pursuit of one thing, the Stanley Cup of advertising: a great ad and maybe a few accolades to go with it.

Now, how does all this work get done? With the help of courtesy, of course. Here’s an example: I pass the puck to you. You need to get it back to me for us to score. Simple, right?

Here’s another: I email you in the morning. “Can you please let me know where project “Protect the Puck” is on the timeline and when I can expect to receive it? Thank you.”

If I don’t hear back from you in a timely fashion, it might paralyze me. By simply taking a few seconds to respond, it helps me to prioritize my work that day and solve problems, finding a way to work around the situation, or work with you to complete the project. I understand that you are busy. We all are. But as a professional you know that all your colleagues are relying on each other to get things done. By giving your team members a quick heads-up, you help them do their jobs better. You also relieve some tension in your own day because it forces you to prioritize too.

There are other benefits that come from workplace courtesy too. When you are kind to and considerate of your colleagues, that will come back to you. The easier you interact with people, the more likely they will be to help you in a pinch if they can. In turn, this makes your team stronger because you can interact with great candor and camaraderie. A strong team in which everyone is working in tandem is tough to beat.

If you do not carry yourself with great workplace courtesy, may the gods of courtesy smite thee!

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Aug7

We Meowed at Lions Health in Cannes

cannes meowCan you believe it’s been almost two months since the very first Lions Health at Cannes! I am actually kicking myself for not writing this sooner, but you know how it goes.

Overall, I thought the standard of work was high, and that’s what you would expect for this type of event. I wouldn’t say that there was a new standard set, but there were definitely new players—non-healthcare agencies that haven’t been bound by medical departments or the weight of the past.

Cannes Lions Health is putting healthcare advertising and communications on the world stage, and I think this is great, but the playing field has just gotten bigger. So us healthcare folk need to stretch ourselves even more and deliver ideas that aren’t a print ad, e-detail aid or a direct mail series. We need to look outside of this and step away from the pharmaceutical/health look, feel, taste and tradition.

I am proud to say Ogilvy CommonHealth Australia did just that with “Cat Ramps,” a little ambient idea that set out to raise awareness of cat osteoarthritis.

Instead of doing posters or an ad, we created a series of specially made ramps with website activation that were placed in Hyde Park Sydney on one day. Park visitors and city workers could interact with the ramps, activate the mobile website, learn about the disease and the signs to watch for, and potentially seek a management plan from their local vet.

The traffic to the website exceeded objectives threefold. Just under their monthly hits was achieved in one day.

Even though we only made it to Finalist, it was a big achievement given the 1,400 entries from 49 countries.

But the biggest achievement was getting this idea signed off and up and running.

So this little meow will hopefully turn into a big roar for Ogilvy CommonHealth Australia as we start our journey toward the next Lions Health in 2015.

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