Mar27

What the WWE Taught Me About Persona Development

I grew up watching WWF (now WWE) wrestling. Every Saturday morning I would rush through my morning breakfast with excitement to see all of my larger-than-life heroes. The sights of Hulk Hogan, “Macho Man” Randy Savage, The Ultimate Warrior, and Ricky “The Dragon” Steamboat enthralled me to a point where I was lost in appearance and personality.

Years later the characters are still there—I’m still a fan, and the audience of young kids appears to be stronger than ever. But how did the WWE keep me interested for the last 20 years? I take this thought and apply it to one of my everyday on-the-job questions: why do our targets—doctors—stop engaging with us after years of product loyalty, and what can we do about it?

With the WWE, it started with there being a 1-900 number that I called. I was overly excited as a kid to dial that number and think that Hulk Hogan was actually talking to me. The data/marketing method of the 1-900 number was very simple: associate numeric to selections on your phone to what you prefer and continue marketing to the contact in the way they want to be marketed to.

For example:  the 1-900 number asked me my age group, I choose #1 for 10-15 years old (type of message to give me); for favorite wrestler, I choose #3 for Hulk Hogan (message specific to my needs); and for the key question—if I would allow them to follow up with me via phone with updates—I choose #1 for yes (continued CRM communication).

Just like that, the 1-900 number captured all my information and knew exactly how to speak to me. To the present day, the WWE still sends me information. The below text is a screen shot of my present day phone and is proof that they remember me and my likes. This was a text sent to me just this past Sunday:

AngeloCampano_WWE
They still know I like the Hulk and they know what appeals to the 30-something me.

Clearly they created a digital persona of me and through all the years of technology used what they learned from me 20 years ago to keep my interests (especially the Hulkster).

The hypothesis that is commonly thought of is that we tend to try looking at our targets in the same way, capture what they like and what they know. We as pharma marketers spend a lot of time chasing the doctor when the doctor doesn’t respond to messages we give him or her.

Looking at a standard CRM program (delivered through multi-channel), those who spend some time targeting the office staff for the first communication have 52% more success reaching the doctor in the second and third communication than those who don’t. Much like the WWE did, we need to take the time to understand our audience, who is REALLY making us money, and how.

As marketing continues to evolve, so do the exercises marketers have been doing for decades. Persona development is not exempt from this trend. Traditional persona development is still a powerful tool for marketers to use. However, targeting these personas with traditional means will prove less and less effective and profitable over time. In order to create and leverage digital persona profiles, marketers must rely on technology to both capture Big Data and use it effectively. The goal of which is to get as close to one-to-one marketing as possible by delivering the right content to the correct person at the best time with the channel they prefer.

As a result, tracking and understanding a person’s digital qualities, digital movement, click data, sales funnel and preferences are important considerations for effectively identifying and building outlying digital personas. The WWE was way ahead of its time for this process.

Marketers who can best leverage digital persona development, content personalization, context marketing and Big Data will be best suited to thrive in the near future. The newer the generation, the greater the expectation is for one-on-one marketing. We can all learn a thing or two from the WWE; their model works and isn’t hard to duplicate (we have already come close to mastering it).

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Also posted in Analytics, content marketing, Content Strategy, CRM, Customer Relationship Marketing, Digital, Physician Communications, Strategy | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Mar6

The Power of Payer: Prescribe All You Want…We Can Block You!

6808124Remember the Doritos slogan, “Crunch all you want, we’ll make more!”? What a mantra, supply and demand. So simple. So obvious.

Sure, prescriber demand plays a role in how available some drugs are, but at the end of the day health plans and formulary P&T committees within hospitals and large practices make category decisions that effect drug availability for patients and directly impact prescribing behavior. These formulary decisions aren’t made in a vacuum, and they can impact your brands, your marketing goals, and play a huge role in getting a leg up in today’s market.

So what do you know about all this? If your client came to you tomorrow in a competitive market situation—multiple new branded entrants, generic domination, or patient abandonment at the pharmacy—and they couldn’t get a foothold, what would you tell them? How would you break that wall? How do you partner with your clients to fulfill your brand’s true market destiny?

Consider what the payer marketing unit can bring to the table for you and your clients. More and more we hear our clients talk about access challenges broadly, issues with patient co-pays, or prior authorizations and step edits getting in the way of reaching marketing goals. In this changing healthcare environment there is so much to consider that plays a role in prescriber decision making, it goes well beyond the clinical profile of your brand. The smarter we all are regarding the holistic considerations of a brand, the better we can show our value as a marketing partner and offer uniquely impactful solutions to our clients.insurances

This is where the Power of Payer comes in. The payer marketing units at Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide want to help provide you with a strong background on health plan and environmental issues to more effectively reach your client’s marketing goals. We are actively working towards open house events for Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide in NJ and NY where we can share information specific to two hot topics:

  • Emerging healthcare models: What are they? How do they hold the keys to success in the market? What should we know about them? Better understand how they act and what these actions mean to our clients and their brands.
  • Payer for newbies: An overview of what a payer is. Who are payer customers and manufacturer clients? How do payer decisions impact overall market sales goals and category usage? Why do we need to consider them when building brand plans and overcoming marketing hurdles?

"Open House” Posting. Part of our “Create a Sign” Series.As part of the Power of Payer open houses, we will also showcase some of the unique work we have done to achieve market success as well as answer any questions you may have about the payer customer, unique challenges your brand may be facing, or just have a fun discussion around environmental trends!

Watch for more information and then mark your calendars to join us for the Power of Payer open houses.

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION: Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com. Please allow 24 hours for response.

Also posted in Access, Branding, Clients, Healthcare Communications, Managed Care, Reimbursement | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Feb26

Digital Trends Impacting US Healthcare – Infographic

In the past year, digital innovations have brought about new markets and channels for digital health interactions. This infographic is a visual mapping of the technologies and innovations which are already playing a key role in shaping the future of healthcare and the experiences and journeys which surround it.

Of course the ACA is affecting healthcare coverage, but it is also affecting our healthcare experiences by placing increased importance on and driving more frequent interactions with NPs, PAs, and Pharmacists. Additionally, more priority has shifted to consumers to educate themselves and take responsibility for their own health, especially when combined with our growing culture of social media and trust networks, and recent draft guidance from the FDA. Video remains hot, but the trending has shifted to the length of videos patients are consuming, increasing its relevance to pharmaceutical marketers. Mobile and tablets continue to grow rapidly, with and quantified self driving deeper engagement though apps, not just web. Last, but certainly not least, EHR is poised to enter the next phase of meaningful use, setting the stage for a platform shake-out as certification requirements evolve to provide more and deeper data sets to systems of connected health as providers continue to on-board.

Infographic of important technologies that impact digital healthcare marketing.

Infographic of important technologies that impact digital healthcare marketing.

Technology is evolving fast, and healthcare, believe it or not, is keeping pace and even leading the charge on many fronts. Spurred on by government mandates and initiatives, innovative organizations ranging from Google and Apple to Silicon Valley startups like Practice Fusion are quickly carrying the ball forward, sometimes struggling to keep pace with consumer expectations of today’s technology. It’s these digital healthcare innovations which have set the trends affecting us today, and will carry us forward to tomorrow.

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION: Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com. Please allow 24 hours for response.

Also posted in adherence, advertising, Data, Digital, Digital Advertising, Healthcare Communications, Infographics, Managed Care, Media, Medical Education, Multi Channel Marketing, Patient Communications, Physician Communications, Research, Social Media, Strategy, Technology | Tagged , , | Leave a comment
Feb21

Choosing Your Road—Transitioning From Bench Science to Specialty Healthcare Communications

road

 

 

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I, I took the one less traveled by…  – Robert Frost

A common question floating around the brains of many researchers is, “Where do I see myself in the future?” It was one that I faced many times throughout my scientific training. The well-travelled path of continuing in academic research is the one that is traditionally followed. But if that’s not for you, what is it like transitioning away from research and into medical/healthcare communications? After years of being a “bench scientist,” the transition to working in an alternative career can be a little scary. As researchers, it may feel like we’re not prepared for a career outside of what we know, but our training actually provides us with a thorough, deep understanding of science and a lot of transferable skills. These skills, including the abilities to learn quickly, problem-solve, integrate information from varied and disparate sources, and communicate and advocate concepts and ideas, can be assets for both the company we work for and the clients we work with. Additionally, it can be really exciting to work on the “other side” of the biomedical industry—taking highly complex scientific information and communicating it to stakeholders in simple and meaningful ways. When working in research, as a natural function of the job we tend to focus very specifically on a disease state and even on a particular pathway or phenomenon within that disease state. As a member of Science and Health Strategy within Specialty Marketing at Ogilvy CommonHealth, I have had the opportunity to touch many aspects of a product’s lifecycle, including brand identity and development, HCP marketing, direct-to-patient marketing, medical advertising and promotion, and scientific communications. Through this career path, I have been able to expand my scientific expertise from a background in virology and immunology to one that encompasses a wide array of therapeutic areas, including oncology. Additionally, through this career path, I’ve been learning more about the multiple channels of communicating scientific/medical information. If you realize that you want to move away from academia or research but don’t know how you can transition, here are some ways the skills we learned as scientists, combined with our scientific knowledge, can apply in the medical/healthcare communications field: 1. Problem solving: As researchers, at some point or another we’ve had to MacGyver our way into how to do an experiment for the all-consuming paper or thesis. It may have involved trying to trouble-shoot an experiment, figuring out how to borrow and extend reagents because research funding was low, or convincing a company that their product was faulty and they needed to return the thousands of dollars you wasted (not to mention time) because of said product. (Yes this has happened, and it was definitely a “no really, it’s not me, it’s you” and “I need a DeLorean” type of situation). When it comes to alternative careers, problems will still be a fact of life. Your ability to recognize the issue, assess the situation, and come up with a solution will be a great asset. 2. Communicating and advocating concepts and ideas: With the number of times we’ve had to give seminars, poster presentations, write papers and abstracts, and present our data at meetings, you’d think we’d have the communication thing down cold. While we have a lot of experience in the art of communicating our ideas and research to a high-science audience, we often forget that they actually aren’t our only audience. An important piece of advice I received when I was a second-year graduate student was to learn to be able to tell people what you do in just a few sentences. Nobody knows what you do better than you do, so this is the best and sometimes most complicated place to start. In a career in healthcare communications, it’s important to be able to communicate high-science information in an easy-to-understand manner. In this career, you’re writing messages for doctors, nurses, patients, and caregivers, so you have a very varied audience in terms of scientific knowledge and expertise. Don’t underestimate the importance of communication and public speaking skills. 3. Integrating information from disparate sources and critically analyzing data: These two skills (which actually encompass many other skills as well) are particularly important for medical/healthcare communications. In this field, one of your jobs is to pick out useful nuggets of information that can help promote your client’s product and position it appropriately in the market, while remembering that fair balance and ethics are critical. Being able to critically analyze data and integrate information can also be useful when strategically comparing your product against the others in the marketplace. When looking for the right opportunity, make sure you find a position and company whose goals and mission match your skills and passions. It’s also important to look for an employer that values its employees having diverse backgrounds so that it can develop solid teams capable of different points of view with a high degree of depth in their respective fields. Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide is one such company that embraces this, and as a result is able to develop unique solutions based on a strong scientific platform communicated across various channels. As a scientist who previously worked with other scientists, it’s been an incredible learning and working experience to be able to function on teams comprised of people of all different backgrounds—from art to copy to project management—and converge all of our talents to provide our clients with marketing, advertising and strategic solutions that are unique and smart. Knowing yourself and what you can offer are the first steps to choosing a path that is beyond the traditional…don’t be afraid to take the road less traveled. CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION: Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com. Please allow 24 hours for response.

Also posted in advertising, Healthcare Communications, Research, Science | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Feb13

You Might Not Realize It, But You Can Be Working For The MI6

MI6What interested me most about James Bond’s career, and, most importantly, that of his support staff, is the development and implementation of a unique and highly versatile arsenal of innovative technology. Starting with Bond’s pager in From Russia With Love, followed by that pen-sized-underwater-oxygen-recycling-breather-thing in Thunderball, or the way-ahead-of-its-time GPS tracker in Goldfinger—all these are examples of an unmet need in spymanship being filled by technology: well researched, well developed, well implemented, and well working.

While recently sitting in a conference room at one of our healthcare client’s headquarters, going through scenario after scenario of possible ways technology can minimize barriers to patients’ prescribed treatment regimen adherence, it was Mr. Bond that my mind turned to.

On a scale from zero to life-changing, healthcare is one of the areas where technology can play a crucial role and provide life-impacting value.

I think back to that scene in Casino Royale where Bond drinks the poisoned Vesper Martini and finds himself staggering back to the car to find a solution to his newly acquired ailment. But which vial from the glove compartment should he inject himself with—blue or red? One will cure him on the spot, the other, of course, will immediately kill him. And here is where technology comes in. He takes a blood sample. The results sync up with the poisons directory back at MI6. On the other side of the globe, Bond’s team reviews the reading in real time and points him to the correct vial.

Oh, and unlike the mini-rocket-launcher cigarette from You Only Live Twice or the bagpipe flamethrower from The World Is Not Enough, this blood-sample transmitter and reader are now out in the market, available for purchase.

In the days where Astounding Innovation greets Cost Efficiency over a bottle of Realistic Possibility for Implementation, the internet of things continues to blossom all around us. Your carbon monoxide detector can now know when you started cooking and tell your thermostat to turn down the heat by 6 degrees; or dim your lights when you walk out of the room; or your door can unlock itself when it senses you down the street. Your FitBit, by linking up with your blood-glucose monitor, can adjust your Seamless menu selection and choice of restaurants for the day (unless you run around the block a few times, that is…). You can start your car with a simple wink. Or, write a script, shoot the footage, do all the post-production work, and distribute the content globally—all from the palm of your hand! Sound familiar?

As this intelligent-device-fueled ecosystem continues to expand, more and more possible hooks arise that are able to feed and empower one another. A chain of monitoring devices, all in constant communication, adjusting themselves and providing information before we even know to ask for it, set the stage for a tremendous opportunity for our healthcare clients.

Spanning over all spectrums of monitoring one’s health habits, from improving existing treatment to preventing a need for a possible treatment a few years down the line, we now have an opportunity to help our clients efficiently channel their investments. If it so happens that after years of R&D, clinical trials and FDA reviews, patients neglect to adhere to their prescribed treatment, the years of innovation and investment lead to questionable marginal benefit, at best! The cost compared to eventual benefit comes out to be quite high. By enlisting connected and innovative technology, we can open the door for researchers, physicians and caretakers to finally close that loop on a number of treatment barriers.

As “Agency” people, with passion and insight into the latest tech innovations, as well as equally deep insight and understanding of our clients’ brands, we have an opportunity to guide our clients into this new area of possibility.

We can now pave a highway between our clients’ amazing potential and this new ecosystem.

We are at a unique crossroads where amazing technology is very much within our reach. The only limit, it seems, is our imagination.

Big ideas often come to us on those “regular days”—on commutes back from work, or walks, late evenings, or days at the beach. So too with our clients, the opportunity to introduce that big tech idea for their brand can arise at any moment—during a casual conversation on a drive back from market research, or after a day-long workshop. We should be well versed and ready to fuel inspiration.

The research team back at MI6 doesn’t wait to prototype a glidesuit-equipped-tuxedo until Bond is jumping off a plane to infiltrate a high-profile cocktail party at some off-the-map nuclear power plant. The research is done in advance. And so is the development and testing. Before the next international crisis even has a chance to escalate, the prototype is out of dry cleaning and ready for action.

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

 

 

Also posted in adherence, advertising, behavior change, Branding, Clients, Healthcare Communications, Technology | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Feb11

How Digitally Savvy Are You? See How You Would Answer the Top 10 Digital Ad Trafficking FAQs

5511521Think you are a brainiac when it comes to digital advertising?  Or do you need a quick refresher on how it all works? The true/false quiz below provides an overview of 10 frequently asked questions regarding digital advertising and the trafficking process.

Q: Most consumer and pharmaceutical websites accept the IAB standard units, also known as the Universal Ad Package: 300×250 (Medium Rectangle), 160×600 (Wide Skyscraper), and 728×90 (Leaderboard).

A: TRUE.

1-       Ad units are labeled based on dimensions (in pixels) of width x height.

2-       While the IAB recently added a fourth size to the Universal Ad Package (180×150 / Rectangle), many pharmaceutical websites have not yet implemented this unit.

Source: http://www.iab.net/guidelines/508676/508767/UAP

Q: Static backups are not required for rich media and Flash banners.

A: FALSE. Static backups are required for all rich media and Flash banner sizes.

1-       If for some reason a user’s Flash player is not functioning properly or if their browser is older and cannot handle more advanced creative assets, the static backup will be displayed in place of the Flash creative. This ensures that whenever an impression is supposed to be served for a campaign, it will be served (even if it is the static backup).

2-       Expandable rich media banners only require static backups for the smaller, unexpanded size.

Source: https://support.google.com/dfa/answer/151646?hl=en

Q: There are no file size restrictions for digital banners.

A: FALSE. Digital banners must be built in 40k or less. 

1-       Static backup banners must be under 40k.

2-       If the Flash banner cannot be built in under 40k, it must either be built as parent/child Flash or as rich media files (depends on ad functionality and client/creative agency preference).

Source: http://www.iab.net/guidelines/508676/508767/displayguidelines

 Q: To “traffic” digital ads, we (the media agency) send the creative directly to the website on which we purchased digital ads.

A: FALSE. We utilize a third-party ad server, DFA, to serve digital banners in most instances.

1-       DFA (aka DART, aka DoubleClick for Advertisers) streamlines the digital trafficking process in a few steps:

  1. We upload media placements and digital banner creative(s) into DFA
  2. We match the placements with the appropriate creative
  3. We export Ad Tags for the placements/creative above, send them to partner websites, and the sites upload them onto the webpages on which we purchased media.
  4. This is where the magic happens. As the page loads when a user visits a site, the site calls on DFA to supply the creative to be displayed in this placement. If it’s our brand’s turn to serve an impression, our creative will be displayed. If we are running multiple creatives, DFA also knows which of our creative’s turn it is based on the rotation we specified. DFA then allows us to track activity on the backend (whether a user clicks on the ad, etc.).

2-       Some websites do not allow or are not capable of accepting third-party trafficking. This is the only instance in which we would not utilize DFA to serve digital banners.

3-       For more information:

  1. http://www.google.com/doubleclick/advertisers/
  2. https://support.google.com/dfa/#topic=2485971

Q: Recommended animation length (for Flash and in-banner videos) is two minutes.

A: FALSE. Best practice and industry standard animation length is 15 seconds.

1-       It is widely believed that after 15 seconds, a user’s attention has already shifted from the banner to other parts of the site, potentially causing a decreased click-through-rate (as a user will miss the primary call-to-action if it occurs after the 15-second mark).

2-       Some websites do not have the capability to serve animation/videos that are longer than :15s; however, some sites will grant case-by-case exceptions if the animation length must be longer due to the amount of important safety information the ad is required to include.

Q: Flash is fully replaceable by HTML5.

A: FALSE. Though HTML5 is an important (and intriguing!) new tool for the creation of rich media and mobile banners, the desktop market is not yet fully prepared to serve HTML5 ads, as many older web browsers do not accept this format. If digital banners are solely built in HTML5, a brand risks frequently running static backups whenever a user’s web browser has not recently been updated.

Q: It is possible to preview a Flash (.swf) creative file without downloading the appropriate software.

A: TRUE. The Flash Validator tool allows you to upload and preview Flash (.swf) files.

1-       This tool not only allows you to preview the creative (how it looks and how the animation works), but it also shows the Flash version the ad was built in, the ad dimensions, the file size, etc.

2-       Tool: https://flashval-temp.appspot.com/validator/

Q: We can track activity on a brand’s website for users who saw our ad, but did not click.

A: TRUE. If the campaign has implemented Ad Tags and Floodlight Tags, we can track viewthrough activity in addition to post-click activity.

1-       Ad Tag—HTML tags generated by DFA and sent to the sites in a campaign. DFA generates unique tags for each placement in a campaign.

2-       Floodlight Tag—HTML code that is placed on a brand’s website to analyze consumer behavior on site after a user has clicked or viewed their ad. When a user views or clicks an ad, and then performs an activity on an advertiser’s webpage that contains Floodlight tags, DFA records and reports on that activity.

Source: https://support.google.com/dfa/topic/20441?hl=en&ref_topic=2485971

Q: Custom e-blasts cannot be tracked through a third-party server.

A: FALSE. We can track clicks on custom e-blasts through DFA if the e-blast creator/distributor includes a click-tracker (1×1) in the e-mail clickthrough URL. Note that some vendors allow and are able to include click-trackers on their custom e-blasts, and some are not.

Q: Black box products cannot run branded Smartphone banners.

A: FALSE. The new IAB Mobile Rising Stars banners allow unbranded banners to expand into branded banners.

Source: http://www.iab.net/risingstarsmobile

Have more questions? Below are a few great places to start, or feel free to reach out to anyone on the Ogilvy CommonHealth Medical Media team!

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Also posted in advertising, Design, Digital, Digital Advertising | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Jan31

How Flexible Are You?

1581156If you work in the creative department in today’s healthcare communications world, you had better be very flexible. Flexible in both mind and spirit.

Gone are the days of working on one piece of business for several years and having a chance to build a strong client relationship that endures for years to come. Welcome to the new world of flexible creativity. Where you have minimal hours in a year to build a brand while trying to build that long-lasting client relationship.

Welcome to the place where you need to shift gears on a week-to-week basis, because many brands nowadays aren’t able to support a fulltime creative person.

Welcome to change. The structure of today’s client brand teams and the type of work we do are very streamlined, with a strong focus on smart, innovative, efficient thinking and execution.

So we must be able to adapt quickly and efficiently to deliver the best work in this new environment. And in many cases we must work across multiple brands with no true base brand to secure us. You might be working in oncology one week, on an OTC the next, or both at the same time.

You need to have a flexible mindset to be able to do this, and the experience in multiple therapeutic categories to back it up.

While it may come across as a head-spinning, anxiety-riddled job, there is a bright side to this. In yesterday’s world many a creative person might have had 3 brands they worked on over the course of their career; they had numerous versions of revised detail aids, ads, iPads or e-details, and their portfolios showed a lack of diversity.

This current flexible creative model allows creatives to explore uncharted territory, learn new categories—at a sometimes rapid rate—but they are gaining a tremendous amount of knowledge and experience across multiple therapeutic areas.

Think of how impressive that will look in your bio and across your portfolio. Think of how exciting it will be to come in and have the opportunity to learn an entirely new space. This is the world today’s creatives live in, and we must embrace it and take advantage of its many positive attributes.

I have personally witnessed many creatives shift gears, enter into uncharted territory, and come out shining, later acknowledging how much they enjoyed the experience and opportunity to work with new faces who have a wealth of experience in these new areas.

So make sure to stretch your body and mind prior to beginning this new activity, because if you are mentally prepared you will truly shine.

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Also posted in advertising, agency life, behavior change, Creativity, Healthcare Communications | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment
Jan28

What Famous Author Honed His Skills as an Ogilvy Copywriter?

2783008If you guessed Salman Rushdie, you’re right. The great novelist started his writing career as a copywriter at the London agency started by the great copywriter David Ogilvy, Joe Bunting posted at Copyblogger.

While his books have captivated the literary world, his advertising credits at Ogilvy & Mather are not too shabby either. Aero is still using his tagline—“Irresistibubble”—for its aerated chocolate bar. Rushdie also came up with “Naughty..but Nice” for Fresh Cream Cakes and a clever line for the Daily Mirror, “Look into the Mirror tomorrow—you’ll like what you see.”

When he wasn’t writing advertisements, Rushdie spent his off hours writing novels. His first book, Grimus, was published during his seven-year stint at Ogilvy & Mather. His second novel, the 1981 award-winning Midnight’s Children, started Rushdie on his path to international fame.

Here’s what Rushdie learned about writing during his copywriting career:

  • Be disciplined. “I write like a job. I sit down in the morning and I do it. And I don’t miss deadlines.”
  • Spend time writing headlines. For his breakthrough novel, Rushdie spent hours typing “Children of Midnight” and “Midnight’s Children” over and over before choosing the latter.
  • Be concise. “One of the great things about advertising is…you have to try to make a very big statement in very few words or very few images and you haven’t much time. All of this is, I feel, very useful,” Rushdie said at the 2008 IAPI Advertising Effectiveness Award ceremony.
  • Rejection is part of writing; use it as motivation. “One must find themselves an editor or, failing that, a group of people who will tell you the truth about your writing, and are not afraid to say, ‘This isn’t good enough.’ … Unless someone can tell you that what you’re writing is no good, then you won’t know how to push it to a point when it can start being good.”

Rushdie credits the habits he formed as an Ogilvy & Mather copywriter to his continued success as a novelist. “I do feel that a lot of the professional craft of writing is something I learnt from those years in advertising, and I will always be grateful for it.”

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

 

 

 

Also posted in advertising, agency life, copywriting, Creativity | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment
Jan23

LIVING THE BRAND—Awakening the Senses at Congress

conventionIt seems that the time has passed when having more sales reps and a bigger booth at a major congress was enough to attract physicians to learn more about your brand. Beyond the financial and compliance challenges that the industry has encountered in the past decade, leading in part to decreasing attendance from physicians, clients as much as agencies are continuously looking for new ways to catch physicians’ attention.

What if physicians were just like us: curious and playful

At times, new data just doesn’t make the cut in the clutter of a congress…and let’s not mention when there is no new data to present. Of course, physicians are interested in learning more about a new product, indication or technique. However, in today’s reality, it just doesn’t seem to be enough. Having physicians engage with the brand in a fun and truly unique way can actually set the ground for a deeper relationship and more memorable experience.  What if detailing on touch screens, offering games or iPad quizzes, to name a few, were already not enough in this rush for new things? What if physicians were just simply looking to (re)connect with brands whilst having fun?

Success lies in the story you tell and how you tell it

Going beyond the usual techniques to drive interest at congress requires us to take a step back and look to the core of what the company, brand or product stands for. What it means for your client and physicians. After all, congresses are a great opportunity to reach a maximum of physicians while bringing your vision to life. The booth and activities around it, including symposia, then are used to articulate this story.

But how to define the story you want to tell? One way to do so is to look at the company or brand ambition. What they want to change or bring in this world, where they make a difference. Another way is to leverage the unique features of the product (eg, physical properties, MOA, mode of administration, unique manufacturing process, etc).

What do you do once you have a clear story? You offer physicians a sensory experience. This is when curiosity and playfulness come into place. Perceiving, feeling and doing will create a true brand experience. Knowledge is only one part of a person’s understanding.

Two client cases can help illustrate how senses can create emotional connections. An ophthalmic pharmaceutical company, living by the vision of “leading a brighter future,” and whose main products are hydrating eye drops, articulated their booth activity around a water light graffiti. As physicians were writing on the wall with water, the surface of the wall made of thousands of LEDs was illuminating. The client got their main message across: water is essential for the eyes to properly function, and light is an important medium for sight.  Another client, a leading dermatology company, developed a full sensory experience to differentiate its new dermal-filler range at launch and demonstrate that each product was customized to fit physicians’ needs. During a major industry event, physicians were welcomed into an experiential room. They were able to walk around and visit various custom-made “tools” to feel and see the products (eg, an injection bar,  a gel texture tool to touch the products, and a visual tool  to play with product elasticity). Both cases were based on the core of the brand vision and did create a memorable journey for physicians.

What will experiential activities do for physicians and your clients?

Physicians are keen to interact with their peers and such activities will make them want to share and tell. Word of mouth will not only drive traffic to your activities but also create brand awareness. Physicians will remember your client’s brand and the experience they had with it. They will probably want to engage with it after the event. Creative executions will also differentiate your client and position them as innovative and bold.

Brand experience is about going back to the basics: our senses

OCH Paris won a 2013 Global Award in the category Art & Technique: User Experience (click here to access the Global Awards website http://www.theglobalawards.com/winners/2013/index.php).

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Also posted in advertising, Branding, conventions, Global Marketing, Healthcare Communications, Pharmaceutical, Physician Communications, Sales Reps, Technology, Uncategorized, Vendors | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Jan16

True Integration of Excellence — the Key to Advertising Success

thumbnailAs the communication dynamic between doctor and patient changes, so too must the model of pharmaceutical promotions—offering a challenge for not only brand communications but also, critically, the agency that drives them.

Thirty to thirty-five years ago, in what some called the heyday of big pharma communications, the model was clear: sell to the doctor, everybody else in the system will follow the prescription. Today, communications must be exquisitely integrated across all channels to ensure receipt of a single and consistent brand message that will align understanding for all. A market where the presumption of even a compelling story of the drug benefits, aligned with a novel diagnosis, would have doctors falling over themselves to prescribe to their presenting patients has passed! Through the decades we have seen an accelerating shift from this—not least with the payer/insurer growing the influence of cost pressure and real evidence-based medicine—but perhaps more subtlety with the changing dynamic between the more savvy and informed patient and their own healthcare professional. As late as the 1980s the primary source of specific medical information for a patient was from their doctor. This moderated a level of control not only in understanding of disease but importantly in the awareness of available treatment options. Today, surveys have consistently indicated that more than half of patients will seek an alternate opinion on a doctor’s diagnosis or recommendations. Surveys reported from Pew Research have indicated that the online medical information services, Google, webMD, medicine.net, NetDoctor, etc, have become the de facto second opinion (and, increasingly often, initial diagnosis) for many patients seeking healthcare information. Balance this with the increasing limitation of the pharma industry presenting similar information to the doctor—through restriction of access by representatives—and we recognize the tension in the market space that must be met to ensure the HCP and their patient remain fully and appropriately informed on drug treatments and medical information. Branded communications must operate in this evolved environment—and the agency of the future likewise.

I joined the team here some 100 days ago, and it is clear Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide stands uncommonly aligned with this demand, with an ability to deliver excellence on communication service across channels from one single business footprint. This is clearly a differentiating feature owned by OCHWW. In a market where single-channel communications have become more and more commoditized, the agency that can truly deliver an integrated communications program will lead. James Chase, Editor in Chief at MM&M, commented in an interview a year ago that “the agency of the future would be able to align communications from one point. To deliver a relevant and targeted  brand message to the HCP, the patient, the payer and all of the relevant stakeholders in a way that offers a seamless understanding of the brand, and that will be the reason for its choice—above others.” This doesn’t mean driving a one-size-fits-all approach to messaging and communications. Quite the reverse! It demands building communications in which each customer will see his own nirvana, but will all appreciate this around a single brand hub. In the savvy patient marketplace it is critical that when the patient asks about a treatment or solution in his/her disease management, their appreciation must clearly vocalize the same entity that the HCP is considering, though not necessarily for the same reasons. The agency that is able to deliver that for brands is one where borderless collaboration of Professional, Payer, Patient and Consumer can build a seamless alignment of brand communications to ensure optimal impact in-market, and drive consistency of a singular message through all media—digital, social, traditional or personal. Few agencies or communication networks have the capability, or indeed passion, to do that.  The OCHWW philosophy of creative excellence in communications demands that each of our agencies across the globe and across customer and media communications channels work in harmony—aligning a core strategy to drive impactful creative that is designed to change customer behavior across all communications channels. The structure here is wonderfully built to achieve this, but at the end of the day it relies on a personal commitment to achieve this success. In a market that demands the agency of the future, Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide is set to offer itself to meet the new communications challenges. Our success, however, depends on the most critical asset of any agency…you!

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Also posted in advertising, Direct-to-Consumer, Global Marketing, Healthcare Communications, Multi Channel Marketing, Planning, Strategy | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment