Aug7

We Meowed at Lions Health in Cannes

cannes meowCan you believe it’s been almost two months since the very first Lions Health at Cannes! I am actually kicking myself for not writing this sooner, but you know how it goes.

Overall, I thought the standard of work was high, and that’s what you would expect for this type of event. I wouldn’t say that there was a new standard set, but there were definitely new players—non-healthcare agencies that haven’t been bound by medical departments or the weight of the past.

Cannes Lions Health is putting healthcare advertising and communications on the world stage, and I think this is great, but the playing field has just gotten bigger. So us healthcare folk need to stretch ourselves even more and deliver ideas that aren’t a print ad, e-detail aid or a direct mail series. We need to look outside of this and step away from the pharmaceutical/health look, feel, taste and tradition.

I am proud to say Ogilvy CommonHealth Australia did just that with “Cat Ramps,” a little ambient idea that set out to raise awareness of cat osteoarthritis.

Instead of doing posters or an ad, we created a series of specially made ramps with website activation that were placed in Hyde Park Sydney on one day. Park visitors and city workers could interact with the ramps, activate the mobile website, learn about the disease and the signs to watch for, and potentially seek a management plan from their local vet.

The traffic to the website exceeded objectives threefold. Just under their monthly hits was achieved in one day.

Even though we only made it to Finalist, it was a big achievement given the 1,400 entries from 49 countries.

But the biggest achievement was getting this idea signed off and up and running.

So this little meow will hopefully turn into a big roar for Ogilvy CommonHealth Australia as we start our journey toward the next Lions Health in 2015.

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Jul9

Is Print Dead?

4144823A lot has changed in print production since I entered advertising in 1987. Back in the day, printing was a form of art. A good printer was worth his or her weight in gold.

But how times have changed! Especially within the last four to five years. Art has taken a back seat, and it is down to price and speed. So what is a print buyer to do in this day and age? Is print going the way of the dinosaurs?

As I think about it, reviewing the latest research and trend reports, I have mixed feelings. I am a print person, I need it in my hand, but that doesn’t stop me from appreciating the digital world. It simply amazes me how far we have come since I started in this business. Google, YouTube, Pinterest, etc. You can find anything you need within seconds. How cool is that?

But hear this! Print is not dead and still has an important place. Just as radio did not bring the death of newspaper, and television did not bring the death of radio, online media will not kill off print media. A wise marketing plan must include a combination of both digital and print. Target your audience, apply segmentation, and adapt the resource allocation based on how your stakeholders prefer to receive their information. And of course, overlayed with analytics!

Print continues to have undeniable advantages over online advertising. It is narrowly targetable, highly personal, and credible to consumers. People trust the printed page. Audience specificity is guaranteed when trying to reach your customers.

In addition, print is tactile, a comfort food for the brain. Consumers are more engaged reading print, unlike websites, which are often skimmed in as little as 15 seconds. Studies have shown that people read digital screen text slower than printed paper and read less of it.

Technology is playing a vital role as well in print. Through the Ogilvy Innovation Lab and emerging technology, unique advances in printing—such as embedding video, QR codes and even adding smell into print—have not only made this channel more interactive, but more engaging as well.

Print is also relatively long-lived while being a solid vehicle for establishing brand identity. Print advertising will continue to be a viable component for an effective multichannel campaign. Understand your customers and how they want to receive information on your product by using the right vehicles:  real-time analytics will help inform your mix of online, print, collateral and event marketing to ensure your campaign is a winner.

So don’t ignore print. It still plays an important role in your brand’s promotional campaign. I just can’t help wondering how the next decade will affect the advertising world….

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Jun26

Brain Candy: Byte-sized Creative Inspiration for Digital Minds—1st Edition

GKblogWhat I love about being an advertising creative is the eternal search for creative stimulus. Always on the search for something that turns your mind on, makes you “think different” and gets you excited to show your co-workers like it was a grade school show-and-tell.

But it’s this stimulus, or this search for stimulus, that really does inspire truly innovative ways to reach our fellow persons with a memorable experience. Sometimes it’s a cool social media tie-in, or maybe a super-sneaky hidden camera capture. Either way, it makes an impression on us and becomes a reference point for the next creative idea, the next killer pitch tactic.

I imagine everyone has his or her favorite sites to mine Internet gold. If you have a site like that, stop hoarding the good stuff and write the next Brain Candy post. Or maybe you just like calling people out for being “two-thousand and late” like an art director I know here at Ogilvy (who will go unnamed for now).

So for now, I’ve collected a few of my favorite inspirations over the last few months to share with you. I hope you find them as inspiring, hilarious and introspective as I did.

Before we dive in, have you seen the site This Advertising Life? No? Really? Then you have to go now… This should be daily viewing for all agency types.

OK, so here are some vids from across the interwebs that I think are pretty cool. Some of them actually lend themselves well as crossovers into the pharma world. But if you can’t sell-in selfies and Snapchat for the latest patient consumer pitch, at least you have some neat stuff to show before your weekly status meeting.

Every now and again you see something and think, “That is genius.” And you just sit at your computer in total awe of your self-contempt for not thinking of it first. Then you think about what must have been going on in that room for someone to have come up with it. Pure Genius.

 

How do you get a paper poster to turn into a musical instrument? I watched this video three times and I’m still amazed.

 

I guess you really can’t beat selfies, beer and Twitter. You have to love the Danes, and they definitely love their Carlsberg. Happy hour will never be the same.

 

This one has been making the rounds lately at the Chocolate Factory—a really impressive way to use augmented reality. We actually worked this into a pitch recently, and this is totally something you can build into a convention experience…minus the alien invasion, I would imagine.

 

I don’t mean to encourage duplicitous behavior, but you have to admit this is pretty funny. On the other hand, this is proof of concept for a CRM or patient reminder app. This app can pulse out reminder messages to patients to take their meds (adherence), get well soon (post surgical), have a good day (depression), or even send out appointment reminders.

 

I always loved reading about twin studies from clinical psych class. There’s something really cool about having such a perfect control for a study design. But multiples kind of freak me out in person though. Anyway, you should listen to your mother and not chew gum in mixed company, here’s why.

 

So you want to have a goof on that dude who’s using waaaaaaay too many hashtags? Here you go, courtesy of Axe. I encourage you all to try this, on yourself!

 

Now let’s close on a high note…if you’re somehow one of the 2 million people who have not seen this ad, just do it.

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Jun4

The Future of Journalism

reporter with camWatching the BBC news the other night, my partner Ben turned to me and asked, “What’s wrong with that reporter’s eyes? It looks like he’s checking himself out in a mirror somewhere.” He was right, the reporter was checking himself out, but it wasn’t in a mirror – he was looking at himself in the viewfinder of his video camera. Much like Tom Daly in his famous ‘coming out’ video – this journalist was recording himself, making the rookie mistake of not locking eyes on the lens, but rather admiring himself.

Video journalism, where the TV news reporter has no crew and does everything themselves, is not new. In fact a decade ago, it was touted as a great way to break into the industry as a rookie reporter. Usually video journalists worked for small television stations or were covering stories in remote parts of the world – on their own. Few people wanted to do it, so video journalism was reserved for stories which didn’t warrant standard quality pictures or audio – I mean you can forgive the shaky or out of focus pictures when the story is coming from war-torn Bosnia!

In this instance, however, the story was coming from the relative safety of East London. Why then, with Broadcasting House virtually in shouting distance, is the Capital’s premier news service using video journalists? The fact is, video journalism has become mainstream and is virtually compulsory on metropolitan newscasts and 24 hour news channels. As public relations practitioners, we’re acutely aware of shrinking newsrooms and cuts to editorial staff across the news media – and healthcare media are no exception. The rise of video journalism is one way on-the-spot reporting has survived in a budget conscious media environment. In fact, some online medical media outlets have actually grown their video news in recent years.

So, in a post ‘information superhighway’ world (remember that chestnut?) where to for journalism? The truth is, news tastes are driven by the audience and as an audience, we’re increasingly less willing to wait for carefully gathered, edited and produced news.  Journalism today is a constant tug-of-war between getting it right and getting it right now – and it’s hard to foresee this trend changing.

Immediacy is increasingly trumping quality as a battle for the ever illusive scope wages on. Journalists are fighting bloggers, gossip merchants and even Joe Public to break a story. The only trouble is, professional journalists have the onus of at least trying to get the facts right.

So not only must a journalist get the story out first, she must also be seen as an authority on the matter and be the most prolific reporter. How else would she have any cred on Twitter? When success as a journalist can equally be measured in Twitter followers as the quality of their work – journalism today requires balancing one’s online clout with actually producing quality news copy. So worried is the BBC about the focus moving toward the former, it issued guidelines in 2012 warning journalists not to break a story on Twitter before informing their newsroom colleagues.

As PR’s, we’re increasingly aware of evolving our output to service the needs of the busy multi-platform journitator. After some tweetable nuggets? Every press release will contain some. Need an on-the-spot TV studio for a quick video interview? We’ve got one waiting for you. Want to write your story two weeks in advance for an autofile while you’re trekking in the Himalayas? No problem, we’ll sort you out with an embargoed brief and interview.

It’s hard to say how journalism will evolve over the next decade, but it’s clear the pressure for immediacy is about as high as it could possibly get. With this immediacy comes a power shift from the outlet to the story teller themselves. For the time being at least, this opens up a broad opportunity for PR’s to offer tailored content across multiple platforms – albeit to a shrinking number of journalists.

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May14

Social Media for Pharma?

stethoscope social mediaHave you been looking for a way for your brand to engage in social media? Are you unsure of what the draft FDA guidance on social media means? Looking for some tips to help get you started? If so, you’re in the right place.

Social media has been an integral part of the digital marketer’s toolbox for several years. It is especially useful for driving brand awareness and generating site traffic. Unfortunately, due to the tightly regulated nature of the pharmaceutical industry, many have been reluctant to implement social media campaigns. Brand marketers have avoided them due to a lack of clear guidance from the FDA, and medical/regulatory review teams have refused to approve social campaigns due to the fear of receiving a dreaded FDA letter.

With the release of draft guidelines by the FDA in January, our industry has been provided with long-awaited parameters. Final guidelines have yet to be issued, but this is a step in the right direction. Slowly, pharmaceutical marketers are dipping their toes in the water. Here is a quick overview of the FDA’s guidance:

  • Brands are responsible for monitoring the content they publish. Content that is repurposed, posted, or used in an inappropriate way is not the responsibility of the pharmaceutical company (as long as the individual repurposing the content is not employed by the pharmaceutical company).
  • Pharmaceutical companies are not responsible for content published by associations and other partners that it provides with financial support (eg, unrestricted educational grants). Content and assets provided are the responsibility of the pharmaceutical company and must still go through typical FDA sampling.
  • Pharmaceutical companies and their representatives must clearly identify their association with brands when participating in conversations.
  • Fair balance is still in full effect. As with any other promotional medium, claims must be counterbalanced with the risks of the drug.
  • FDA submissions of interactions do not have to be submitted in real-time. Conversations that take place can be sampled after the fact to keep brands in compliance.

You can access the full document here.

Feeling more comfortable with the guidelines? Are you ready to deploy a social media campaign? Here are some tips to get you started:

  • Start with a strategy. As obvious as this seems, people are so anxious to implement a social media campaign, they dive in headfirst. Ensure you identify the goal of your campaign so you can measure the results of your efforts.
  • Engage in conversations with your audience. People use social media to connect with people, rarely with brands. Talk to them about topics that matter to them and are appropriately linked to your brand (eg, an antidepressant sponsoring a support forum providing tips to patients and caregivers on ways to remain positive and the importance of adherence).

According to a 2012 channel preferences research report published by ExactTarget, Facebook and Twitter rank at the bottom (4% and 1%, respectively) of channels participants want used for promotional messaging. This accentuates the importance of finding a healthy balance between brand promotion and human interaction. You can access the research here.

  • Messages must be relevant and fresh. They must take into account the context, location and intention of your audience. Not every opportunity that arises to share your marketing message should be taken. Selectivity is part of the secret to success.
  • Be flexible. The future is unpredictable. For brands to thrive in social media, they must be ready to act in the blink of an eye. Editorial calendars should not be set in stone.
  • Listen closely to the feedback of your audience and take action. The most insignificant of posts can take on a life of its own, leaving marketers scrambling to control the fallout.
  • Always have a social media crisis plan in place. Sitting idly by and not taking action is tantamount to brand suicide. Does anyone remember #mcdstories, #askJPM or #myNYPD? If not, hop on Twitter and search for the aforementioned hashtags. All are examples of hashtags that turned into “bashtags” and left their respective marketing agencies scratching their heads and scrambling to minimize the damage.

Although the pharmaceutical industry is heavily regulated, social media is an opportunity to connect with your audience and should not be overlooked. With the draft FDA guidelines in hand and a sound strategy, you can now connect with consumers through social media.

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Apr29

Are Banner Ads Banner Advertising?

doc writing“Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don’t know which half” – John Wanamaker[1]

John Wanamaker was a successful U.S. Postmaster General, as well as an effective merchant who owned many retail stores throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s. Wanamaker died in 1922, over 90 years ago.[2]

The question that plagued Wanamaker almost 100 years ago still afflicts many marketers today. Some progress has been made as current technology and data platforms, such as Site Catalyst and Google Analytics, help marketers understand who is receiving non-personal promotions (NPP) like email or direct mail. These platforms even help marketers understand who is clicking to a particular website through emails, and further actions taken after clicking through. However, these platforms cannot aid marketers in understanding the reach and actions from all different kinds of channels.

Tactics such as direct mail, email, fax, postcards, etc., are all targeted tactics. A company can deploy all of these tactics to reach a specified audience of physicians through knowing the HCP’s email, address, and name. This same company deploying these tactics may even divide their target audience into different groups through segmentation of a specialty, age, geographic region, past behavior, number of field rep visits, etc. This company can then understand which tactics are most effective for each segment. For example, direct mail can include a vanity URL, which hematologists may take the most action on. Likewise, pulmonologists may have the most website downloads after clicking through an email. These realizations can help a company specify future marketing communication so that HCPs are individually receiving the NPP that is most appropriate for them.

Targeted tactics can help us understand a lot about an audience, but how does a marketer understand promotions such as banners? Or actions taken on a website if the website does not require registration? How does a marketer attribute these non-targeted tactics back to specific physicians in their target audience? Most healthcare brands cannot currently attribute the money spent on banners and website content to specific HCPs. Companies can engage in cookies or fingerprinting software tracking, but this tracking technology can prove costly and comes with a privacy controversy.[3]

While most healthcare brands are not at an advanced tracking level, marketers can estimate which HCPs in their target audience are viewing which banners. This means we can estimate who these banners are reaching, and who is taking further action on these banners.

We can estimate the effects that banner clicks are having on total response rate, and even the effect of banners on script writing.

We calculate this estimated reach attribution through first breaking up the United States into 212 different designated marketing areas (DMAs). With simple banner tracking, we can then look at which DMAs are receiving the highest number of impressions, and which are receiving the lowest. Then, we can look at each DMA at the HCP level. As long as we understand who exists in a brand’s target audience, we will have each HCP’s address, and can then tell which DMA an HCP lives/works in.

Next, we develop a reach threshold to begin to estimate who each non-targeted tactic is reaching. We take the average number of impressions per HCP in a DMA to develop the reach threshold. If the number of impressions in a DMA were over a predetermined amount, then we would assume that all of the physicians in that DMA have seen the banner. Likewise, if the number of impressions in a DMA were below a certain amount, we would estimate that none of the targeted physicians in that particular DMA have seen the banner.

While our understanding of non-targeted tactic reach is only at the estimation level, this can help us increase our understanding of total reached HCPs, and what channels have reached these HCPs. One healthcare drug in particular, before this estimated reach was analyzed, showed a 93.9% reach certainty through targeted tactics. With the estimated reach analysis added, the brand saw that banner impressions increased their overall reach to 99.7%, and 95.6% of HCPs were estimated to have been touched with banner impressions. This brand had invested a big portion of their budget in banner impressions, and they were ecstatic to find out that banners had reached over 95% of their targeted audience.

This idea of estimated reach could be rolled out to several industries beyond healthcare as a way to fully understand the impact of all tactics without extensive tracking methods. After all, the most important thing that marketers want to know is which half of their advertising budget is money well spent.

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Apr17

Multi-Screen Is the New “Mobile First”

screensFor the past few years, “Mobile first!” has been the rally cry of marketers. The idea was to design websites and ads to work on mobile devices first to account for the growing smartphone- and tablet-using audience. But mobile first is already obsolete; if your strategy doesn’t have multiple screens in mind, then your strategy is out-of-date.

Time spent on mobile devices is steadily increasing. Throughout the day, consumers are moving seamlessly back and forth between many devices, from laptops to smartphones to tablets to TVs. In fact, 90% of consumers start a task on one device and finish it on another. Oftentimes consumers are using more than one device at a time, fluidly flipping back and forth between screens.

This complexity in user behavior makes it imperative for marketers to embrace a multi-device strategy, not just a mobile-first one.

You must now develop ads that work across these multiple devices. The ads should seamlessly leverage the characteristics of each device for optimal user experience. Additionally, where consumers used to be focused on one device at a time, now they are on multiple devices simultaneously, so messaging needs to adapt to the multi-device paradigm as well.

Consumer search trends support the need for multi-screen advertising. According to eMarketer, U.S. mobile search ad spending grew 120.8% in 2013, contributing to an overall gain of 122.0% for all mobile ads. Meanwhile, overall desktop ad spending increased just 2.3% last year. Marketers should not only develop ads for multiple platforms, they should optimize their spending across platforms as well.

Ad targeting also becomes paramount in the multi-screen world. Targeting ads to specific devices and operating systems is the most basic method of mobile ad targeting. But much like the desktop environment, user insights can be culled from the type of content consumed on tablets and smartphones. These insights can then be used to further target mobile audiences.

As consumers continue to access content across multiple devices, marketers must continue to grow and change with them to meet their needs no matter which device(s) they are using.

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Apr10

The Cycle of DTC

blueskyThe history of DTC advertising (and by that I mean all consumer/patient outreach, not just TV), has seen a number of highs and lows over the years.

When campaigns first launched in the late ’90s and early 2000s, we watched as pharma marketers and their agencies worked to create brands out of medicines that, quite frankly, most users didn’t really want to have a relationship with.

During that time, we watched as Claritin and later Clarinex integrated graphics and special effects into their messages; we were introduced to critters including the Zoloft blob and Digger; we applauded the uniqueness of Vytorin’s “food & family” representation of the 2 sources of cholesterol. The Lunesta moth was heralded as iconic, while some of us scratched our heads over the story of Abe & the beaver as told by Rozerem.

The list goes on and on…. The point being, these were campaigns that sparked a reaction (good and bad), told a story, leveraged an insight, and by most accounts, helped our clients successfully market their drugs.

By the late 2000s, many of us noticed a perceptible shift in pharmaceutical campaigns. Some of this was coincident with a number of significant safety issues that prompted some of the major advertisers to pull back, and as more and more companies sought to “preclear” their ads through DDMAC and then OPDP, the feedback, in many cases in my experience, resulted in campaigns that while still engaging on some levels appeared to stop just short of eliciting any kind of emotion or reaction (again, good or bad). Our work still resulted in positive ROIs, it still won awards, but it just wasn’t the type of work that had people talking.

I’m happy to say that lately, the tide seems to be turning. Recent advertising for Crestor reinforces a positive brand experience by literally depicting a patient as a fan. A fairly light-hearted approach that still seems appropriate and responsible, still depicts the risks and benefits in a balanced manner, but one that evokes an emotional reaction, and presumably for Crestor users present and future, a connection with the brand. And campaigns like Novartis’ Gilenya illustrate how a brand can connect with patients—literally and figuratively.

Another positive outcome of this shift back to more emotive and insightful DTC appears to be a resurgence of more disease education. These campaigns are not only getting people to the doctor for appropriate medical advice and care, they are inspiring conversations and connections. Gilead’s “Full Frontal” campaign is provocative and buzz-worthy on the basis of its name alone…but the drama of the idea coupled with the real patient stories just increases the emotional impact and call to action.

So the next time a DTC ad turns up on your TV or Facebook feed…don’t skip it…you might be pleasantly surprised that DTC is back!

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Apr3

Benefits of Rich Media

The digital pharmaceutical advertising market is proving to be a growing and changing market.  Gradually over the past couple of years, more innovative tactics have become more relevant. Rich media is one tactic that has become more widely accepted not only by pharma companies and advertisers, but also by publishers. Some of you may be asking, what is rich media and why is it becoming more popular?

Rich Media Banner—This is an ad that can contain images and/or video and involves some kind of user interaction which can elicit strong user response. The ads can include multiple levels of content in one placement.

what_is_rich_media_small

 

 

The benefits of using rich media:

Ads Expand—The creative expands when the user interacts with the main image (for example, by clicking or mousing over it). This allows for a larger area to display more robust information, creative artwork and messaging while still being able to include a scrolling ISI and creative assets (videos, clinical data, polls/surveys, etc).

Breaks Through Banner Blindness—Banner blindness is a phenomenon in web usability where visitors to a website consciously or subconsciously ignore banner-like information, which can also be called ad blindness or banner noise. Rich media ads are more attention-grabbing and interactive, which helps separate them from being banner-like. Rich media banners also have proven to outperform standard display banners in key metrics such as time spent and interaction rate.

Information—Rich media banners can contain a significant amount of information, especially compared to standard display ads. This information can consist of videos, charts, clinical data, polls/surveys, or multiple creative messages. This allows advertisers to reach a larger target audience while also providing more options for multi-indication brands in one banner ad.

Metrics—The metrics in rich media banners are also greatly improved. Rich media offers standard metrics and also custom metrics. Standard metrics are more commonly known and consist of metrics like total display time, number of expansions, interactive impressions, and interactive rate. Custom metrics are added to components within a rich media banner, and only three different types are used: exits, counters and timer. These custom metrics can actually track a variety of calls to action within a rich media banner, like links within the banner, time spent on certain screens or data, and of course any click-through calls to action. These robust metrics offer a huge advantage over standard display banners which rely heavily on impressions and clicks.

User Experience—Overall user experience is improved through the use of rich media. The creative messaging can be so robust within a rich media banner that a call to action such as a click-through is not required. This actually allows users to stay on the same page where they saw the rich media banner, as opposed to clicking on a non-rich media banner that takes them to an entirely new page.

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Mar20

The Best of SXSW 2014

sxsw logoI could give you a top 10 list or a top 5 list of what was best at SXSW. That would be great if I were trying to convince you of why attending SXSW is an amazing learning experience. However, what I’d like to provide is the best single thing I learned, and get into some actionable details.

So, I was ready to get into what seemed to be a great talk. I was on line waiting, about a dozen people away from the door, when I heard, “Sorry, this session is full.” So with that news I went next door and found a talk titled, “Let’s Get Physical—Design + Embodied Cognition,” by Michael Hendrix, Partner and Creative Director at IDEO. By chance, I’d just found what was to me the best talk of SXSW.

Embodied cognition is the theory that the human mind is largely determined by the form of the human body. To simplify, the mind is experiencing the world through all our senses. The more senses that are stimulated, the more powerful the experience.

The really interesting part of this is that our minds cannot really differentiate a real experience from an imagined one. For example, when we go to the movies and experience an action-packed film, we are experiencing intense visual and aural senses. Our reaction to this fabricated experience is that we may be sitting forward in our seat, our heart rate may increase and the palms of our hands may even sweat. Our minds are telling our bodies to react to the imaginary experience as though it’s real. This is powerful stuff. The more senses we engage in an experience, the more our minds take that experience in and make it memorable.

Brands are already using this principle to design their products to convey a certain aesthetic to potential buyers. One example provided at the SXSW session was that BMW makes the hinges on their car doors heavier to convey quality and safety. People who are looking to buy a car will place a premium on a safe, well-built car.

So how does this apply to our world of marketing? Well, let’s say we are creating an iPad piece for sales reps to detail to doctors. It is common for these to include some basic ways of swiping or tapping to navigate to content. Additionally, it is the sales rep who is usually using the device. However, if we want to make this experience memorable for doctors, we should put the device in their hands and tap into more of their senses. We should think about including interesting visual and audio content. Additionally, we can use the interactive capabilities of the iPad to engage even more of the senses. For example, the iPad will recognize with its built-in gyroscope if it’s tilted or moved in a three-dimensional space, with its motion sensor if it’s shaken, or with its multi-touch screen if it’s touched with multiple fingers.

This may sound like fun and games or interaction for interaction’s sake but there is real scientific research that backs up communicating this way. The more we can tap into human senses when we communicate, the more powerful and memorable the communication will be. And remember, that goes for real and imagined experiences. This is an idea that can breathe new life into the way we think about our clients’ needs.

SXSW Series:

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